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I have a Static helper class implemented that helps cache and retreive some read-only, non-mutable, non-volatile data from the database.

(Stripped) Example:

public class CacheHelper
{
    private static HashMap foos, bars;

    public static Foo getFoo(int fooId) { /* etc etc */ }
    public static Bar getBar(int barId) { /* etc etc */ }

    public static void reloadAllCaches()
    {
        //This is where I need it to lock access to all the other static methods
    }
}

The way I've read it for static classes, If I add the synchronized keyword to the reloadAllCaches() method, this will apply a lock on the entire class while that method executes. Is this correct? (Edit: Yep, not correct. Thanks for the responses. )

Note: I would like to remain agnostic to the thread safety of the getter methods and the objects they return as this data is never mutated and would like it to be returned as fast as possible.

share|improve this question
    
Can't you use a ConcurrentMap? Do you need the whole map to be updated at once or is it ok to have some values updated and some not? – assylias Jul 18 '12 at 13:35
    
It is clearing the maps, then (more or less) dumping entire contents of tables into them after some formatting. Although your suggestion is viable if I wrapped in some logic to only update entities, etc, but I'd rather it be a clean table dump each time. – Eric Jul 18 '12 at 14:01
1  
You don't need locking for this. Build entirely new maps and assign them to volatile fields. The maps themselves can be plain ordinary HashMaps, perhaps wrapped for safety into immutableMaps. I assume only one thread will do the rebuilding. – Marko Topolnik Jul 18 '12 at 14:11
    
That is correct, a single thread will build. In rebuilding them, i clear the existing map and repopulate.... but your suggestion is intriguing also, if I build it as a new map, then just assign it over top the old volatile one, it may accomplish the same goal. – Eric Jul 18 '12 at 14:20
up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you add the synchronized keyword to the reloadAllCaches() function all other static functions in the class that got the synchronized keyword can't execute while the reloadAllCaches() function is running.

How ever non-static functions can execute, not matter if they got the synchronized keyword or not. Also all other functions without the synchronized keyword can execute.

After all a function with the synchronized can be looked at like:

public class Bar
{
    public static void foo()
    {
        synchronized (Bar.class)
        {
            // your code
        }
    }
}

A non-static function with the synchronized keyword can be looked at like this:

public class Bar
{
    public void foo()
    {
        synchronized (this)
        {
            // your code
        }
    }
}

So static and non-static functions have a different synchronization context and do not block the execution of each other with the synchronized keyword.

For your case I suggest the usage of a ReentrantReadWriteLock. This class will allow any number of functions to get a read-lock at the same time but only one function to get a Write-Lock. The write lock is only acquired when there is no read-lock in place and no read-lock is acquired as long as a write-lock is in place.

You can make your reload function fetching a write-lock and all your reading function fetching a write-lock. You have to use a static instance of the ReentrantReadWriteLock of cause.

My proposal is to implement it like this:

public class CacheHelper
{
    private static HashMap foos, bars;
    private static java.util.concurrent.locks.ReadWriteLock lock = new java.util.concurrent.locks.ReentrantReadWriteLock();

    public static Foo getFoo(int fooId)
    {
        lock.readLock().lock();
        try {
            /* etc etc */
        } finally {
            lock.readLock().unlock();
        }
    }
    public static Bar getBar(int barId)
    {
        lock.readLock().lock();
        try {
            /* etc etc */
        } finally {
            lock.readLock().unlock();
        }
    }

    public static void reloadAllCaches()
    {
        lock.writeLock().lock();
        try {
            //This is where I need it to lock access to all the other static methods
        } finally {
            lock.writeLock().unlock();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is precisely the behavior I was wanting to emulate. To ensure I understand you correctly, the lock.readLock.lock() will only block when there is a write lock in place? There can be as many readLock()'s at a time (when there is no write)? – Eric Jul 18 '12 at 13:54
    
Exactly. There can be as many read-locks as you like while there is no write-lock. How ever once a write-lock is requested, no new read-locks are allowed and once all read-locks are unlocked, the write-lock is acquired. – Nitram Jul 18 '12 at 13:59
    
You rock. Thank you for the suggestion. I didnt know such a construct already existed. I was hoping I didn't have to roll my own :) – Eric Jul 18 '12 at 14:03
    
Thank you for taking something so complex and boiling it down to its most basic principles so succinctly and eloquently :) – advocate Nov 13 '14 at 23:36

No, this isn't correct. Adding synchronized to only the reloadAllCaches method means that callers of that method must acquire the lock on the class, but threads calling non-synchronized methods can still access the class concurrently. You still need the accessors to be synchronized on the same lock for this to be safe, otherwise the reader threads may not see the latest changes and will get stale data. Alternatively you could use ConcurrentHashMap.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the clarification. @Nitram has an interesting solution that will not block accessors from each other, only from the reload method. – Eric Jul 18 '12 at 13:58

If you want the ability to re-populate the collections without locking them, youc an replace them with immutable collections.

private static volatile Map foos, bars;

public static Foo getFoo(int fooId) { return foos.get(fooId); }
public static Bar getBar(int barId) { /* etc etc */ }

public static void reloadAllCaches()
{
    Map newFoo = ...
    // populate newFoo
    foos = newFoo;

    Map newBar = ...
    // populate newBar
    bars = newBar;
}

getFoo will see a complete consistent copy without the need for locks as the Map is always replaced, never modified.


synchronized locks objects not methods, in this case you are locking the CacheHelper.class object

To make the getters fast as possible, you can use a ConcurrentHashMap instead of using synchronized


An example of using synchronized only for updates.

final ConcurrentMap<Key, ExpensiveObject> map =

public ExpensiveObject getOrNull(Key key) { 
     return map.get(key); 
}

public ExpensiveObject getOrCreate(Key key) {
     synchronized(map) {
         ExpensiveObject ret = map.get(key);
         if (ret == null)
              map.put(key, ret = new ExpensiveObject(key));
         return ret;
     }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Unless he needs the map to be updated atomically. If he doesn't that's the way to go... – assylias Jul 18 '12 at 13:37
    
He can use synchronized for updates on a ConcurrentMap if required. If this only changes one key at a time, you can get() keys without synchronized. – Peter Lawrey Jul 18 '12 at 14:51
    
He needs to block his reading methods while updating the map. Not sure how you would do that without synchronizing everything which kind of defeats the purpose of a CHM. In his case, the readwritelock seems like a good way. – assylias Jul 18 '12 at 14:53
    
That is one option. Adding an example of what I mean above. – Peter Lawrey Jul 18 '12 at 14:55
2  
In that case he can replace the map. This avoid the need for synchronization. – Peter Lawrey Jul 18 '12 at 15:44

Rather than applying lock on CacheHelper Class object(CacheHelper.class) in reloadAllCaches() you can apply this lock inside this method on some piece of code because all methods i see are static and if you make them all synchronized then all threads will be blocked if any thread is accessing any method.

share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly what I don't want to do - I only want to block all threads when the reload is occurring. (reloadAllCaches()) – Eric Jul 18 '12 at 13:44

In simple terms the lock only prevents other threads from running the same method at the same time, it does not provide any locking resources over any other content in the class, static or otherwise.

Other threads will block access to the method only until the thread that has control exits that method. Access to anything else is still free for all threads.

If you need locking control over the object itself then you'll need to consider providing thread safe accessors or some kind of succession processing for the cache.

By that I mean that if you construct a new cache within this method, and once constructed replace the referenced objects in the cache helper with those new objects, then simply synchronising the reloadAllCaches method will be all you'll need to do.

However, if your intention is to reuse/recycle the existing cache containers then you will have to use locking at the container level to prevent reads while the cache is being destroyed and reconstructed.

If your neeeding to reload multiple cached maps (as per your example) then you may find it necessary to abstract away the cached objects another layer otherwise you might get out of sync access to the caches as you re apply them.

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