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I'd like to to GET a Java object with a REST call, using Jersey. The question: can I send object of class A and receive object of class B, if A has all B's members?

Let me show an example:

 class A {
    String one;
    Date two;
    int three;
 }

 class B {
    Date two;
    int three;
 }

Lets say, I have a REST service:

class MyREST {

  @GET
  @Path("somepath")
  public void getThing() {
     return new A();
{

and I call it with a code:

Client client = Client.create();
WebResource scResource = client.resource("somePath");

MyClass result = scResource.type(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON_TYPE).accept(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON_TYPE).get(B.class);    
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you might want to consider accepting answers to your previous questions –  ant Jul 18 '12 at 13:27
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2 Answers 2

Actually, it is possible.

Jackson will marshall/unmarshall the class to JSON, and the other end won't notice which class it was as long as it can parse it.

But your code has several errors:

  • Make your attributes private, then provide getter/setter methods. This, for every java class.
  • Annotate the classes with @XmlRootElement at least, so Jackson can find them
  • Annotate the methods with @Produces and @Consumes setting them to JSON

The following code works fine (I changed the format to XML for convenience, it should be the same in JSON):

TestServlet:

@Path("/testDifferentClass")
public class TestServlet {

    @GET
    @Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_XML)
    @Consumes(MediaType.APPLICATION_XML)
    public ClassA getClassA() {
        ClassA classA = new ClassA();
        classA.setOne("Hello");
        classA.setTwo(new Date());
        classA.setThree(1);
        return classA;
    }
}

ClassA:

@XmlRootElement(name = "common")
public class ClassA {

    private String one;
    private Date two;
    private int three;

    public String getOne() {
        return one;
    }
//more getters and setters

ClassB:

@XmlRootElement(name="common")
public class ClassB {

    private String one;
    private Date two;

    public String getOne() {
        return one;
    }
//more getters and setters

TestDifferent:

public void test() {
    Client client = Client.create();
    WebResource scResource = client.resource("http://localhost:8080/services/testDifferentClass");

    ClassB result = scResource.type(MediaType.APPLICATION_XML).accept(MediaType.APPLICATION_XML).get(ClassB.class);
    System.out.println(result.getOne());
    System.out.println(result.getTwo());
}

The ouput is Hello and today's date

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It is possible if your class A has any relation with class B or B has relation with class A.

But in your code it seems there is no any relation, so it's not possible with relation.

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Thank you. Will It work if B extends A? –  sunny Jul 18 '12 at 13:33
    
The relationship between classes has anything to do with it. Please check my answer. –  Eugenio Cuevas Jul 18 '12 at 16:02
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