Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to compare two strings and as output I would like a count of consecutive identical characters, and if the character is different, just the char from the second string. I have a working recursive implementation, but I can't figure out how to add consecutive counts together

Code:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;
$Data::Dumper::Indent = 0;
$Data::Dumper::Terse  = 1;

my $str1 = "aaaaaaaaaaaabbbbbbbbbbbccccccccdddddddddddeeeefffffff";
my $str2 = "aaaaaaaaaaaabbbbbbbbbbbccccccccxxxxxxxddxxeeeefffffff";

sub find_diff {
    my ( $a, $b ) = @_;
    my @rtn = ();
    my $len = length $a;
    my $div = $len / 2;
    if ( $div < 1 ) {
        return $b;
    }
    my $a_1 = substr $a, 0, $div;
    my $b_1 = substr $b, 0, $div;
    if ($a_1 eq $b_1) {
         push @rtn, length $a_1;
    }
    else {
        push @rtn, find_diff( $a_1, $b_1 );
    }
    my $a_2 = substr $a, $div;
    my $b_2 = substr $b, $div;
    if ($a_2 eq $b_2) {
        push @rtn, length $a_2;
    }
    else {
        push @rtn, find_diff( $a_2, $b_2 );
    }
    return @rtn;
}

print Data::Dumper::Dumper( [ find_diff('xaabbb', 'aaabbc' ) ] ) . "\n";
print Data::Dumper::Dumper( [ find_diff('aaabbb', 'aaabbc' ) ] ) . "\n";
print Data::Dumper::Dumper( [ find_diff( $str1, $str2 ) ] ) . "\n";

Output:

['a',2,1,1,'c']
[3,1,1,'c']
[26,3,1,1,'x','x','x','x','x','x','x',1,1,'x','x',4,7]

Desired Output:

['a',4,'c']
[5,'c']
[31,'x','x','x','x','x','x','x',2,'x','x',11]

Of course I can split the characters into an array with unpack and then count consecutive matches fairly easily, but I want to try a divide-and-conquer approach so I can compare performance.

Thanks!

Edit -- Managed to solve it in the recursive case by returning a nested array and then reducing. It's suprisingly not that slow:

sub find_diff {
    my ( $a, $b ) = @_;
    my @rtn = ();
    my $len = length $a;
    if ( $len < 2 ) {
        return [$b, 0];
    }
    my $div = $len / 2;
    my $a_1 = substr $a, 0, $div;
    my $b_1 = substr $b, 0, $div;
    if ($a_1 eq $b_1) {
        push @rtn, [length $a_1, 1];
    }
    else {
        push @rtn, find_diff( $a_1, $b_1 );
    }
    my $a_2 = substr $a, $div;
    my $b_2 = substr $b, $div;
    if ($a_2 eq $b_2) {
        push @rtn, [length $a_2, 1];
    }
    else {
        push @rtn, find_diff( $a_2, $b_2 );
    }
    return @rtn;
}
sub compress_string {
    my ($a, $b) = @_;
    my @list = find_diff($a, $b);
    my $acc = 0;
    my @result = ();
    foreach my $item (@list) {
        if ( $item->[1] ) {
            $acc += $item->[0];
        } else {
            push @result, if $acc;
            push @result, $item->[0];
            $acc = 0;
        }
    }
    push @result, $acc if $acc;
    return @result;
}

Results match what I want.

Update - Performance Stats

this is really interesting. Using unpack( 'C*', $string) is insanely fast and I think it's why my iterative version is so speedy. The speed advantage of recursive comes out with the longer string (434 chars)

                         Rate short_recurse_borodin short_recurse short_array_borodin short_array_sodved short_array
short_recurse_borodin  6944/s                    --          -31%                -36%               -73%        -84%
short_recurse         10091/s                   45%            --                 -8%               -61%        -76%
short_array_borodin   10929/s                   57%            8%                  --               -57%        -74%
short_array_sodved    25707/s                  270%          155%                135%                 --        -40%
short_array           42553/s                  513%          322%                289%                66%          --
                      Rate mid_array_borodin mid_recurse_borodin mid_string mid_array_sodved mid_array
mid_array_borodin   1418/s                --                -28%       -56%             -65%      -82%
mid_recurse_borodin 1972/s               39%                  --       -39%             -52%      -76%
mid_recurse         3226/s              127%                 64%         --             -21%      -60%
mid_array_sodved    4082/s              188%                107%        27%               --      -49%
mid_array           8065/s              469%                309%       150%              98%        --
                       Rate long_array_borodin long_array_sodved long_recurse_borodin long_array long_string
long_array_borodin    172/s                 --              -67%                 -80%       -85%        -89%
long_array_sodved     513/s               199%                --                 -40%       -55%        -67%
long_recurse_borodin  854/s               397%               66%                   --       -25%        -45%
long_array           1142/s               564%              122%                  34%         --        -26%
long_recurse         1546/s               800%              201%                  81%        35%          --
share|improve this question
2  
    
That's interesting, your example is doing run-length encoding on a single string, but I'm not sure how that applies to enumerating the differences between 2 nearly identical strings. I want to be able to recover the original string given the reference and the encoded string and to do so with the minimum characters. –  Sekenre Jul 18 '12 at 14:03
1  
@Sekenre: Despite my reservations, I have updated my solution to show a recursive approach. The benchmarking is down to you! Please post your results. –  Borodin Jul 18 '12 at 17:01
add comment

3 Answers

Edit: Oops, sorry. Just saw you comment about wanting to use recursion and splitting the string. So my answer is not really appropriate, sorry about that. I'll leave it anyway.

I don't think you need recursion. The following works

use Data::Dumper;

sub find_diff($$)
{
    my( $a, $b ) = @_;
    my @res;
    my @a = split( '', $a );
    my @b = split( '', $b );
    # Assume a and b are the same length
    my $mcount = 0;
    for( my $i = 0; $i < scalar(@a); $i++ )
    {
        if( $a[$i] eq $b[$i] )
        {
            $mcount++;
        }
        else
        {
            if( $mcount )
            {
                push( @res, $mcount );
            }
            $mcount = 0;
            push( @res, $b[$i] );
        }
    }
    if( $mcount )
    {
        push( @res, $mcount );
    }
    return @res;
} # END find_diff

print Data::Dumper::Dumper( [ find_diff('xaabbb', 'aaabbc' ) ] ) . "\n";
print Data::Dumper::Dumper( [ find_diff('aaabbb', 'aaabbc' ) ] ) . "\n";
share|improve this answer
    
This was my first version, except I used unpack instead of split for speed (I only care about ASCII). It's seriously fast for short strings, but as I am finding, if I have a long string with few differences, the recursive version draws ahead. Benchmarks tomorrow. –  Sekenre Jul 18 '12 at 17:09
    
Yeah, makes sense. In C the above would be as fast as any recursive solution (all bytes must be scanned). What the split/unpack is paying for is perl's string management overhead (lots of newSV calls), so comparing longer strings is a faster solution. –  Sodved Jul 18 '12 at 23:33
    
Benchmarks added –  Sekenre Jul 19 '12 at 13:53
add comment

Despite my reservations, I have updated my solution to show a recursive approach. The benchmarking is down to you! Please post your results.

Recursion, or the divide and conquer approach, aren't appropriate to this problem. In the end every pair of characters must be compared and the number of consecutive matching characters evaluated. It makes no difference whether you do this all at once or if you split the string into two, work on each half separately, and recombine the results. In fact, because of the code required to split and combine the intermediate results a recursive solution is bound to be slower.

This problem should be approached by splittting both strings into individual characters and comparing each pair of characters from the two sequences.

This solution seems to do what is required and also accounts for the case where the two strings are of different length.

use strict;
use warnings;

use Data::Dump;

my $str1 = "aaaaaaaaaaaabbbbbbbbbbbccccccccdddddddddddeeeefffffff";
my $str2 = "aaaaaaaaaaaabbbbbbbbbbbccccccccxxxxxxxddxxeeeefffffff";

dd [ find_diff( 'xaabbb', 'aaabbc' ) ];
dd [ find_diff( 'aaabbb', 'aaabbc' ) ];
dd [ find_diff( $str1, $str2 ) ];
dd [ find_diff( 'xxx', 'xx' ) ];

sub find_diff {

  my @str1 = unpack '(A1)*', shift;
  my @str2 = unpack '(A1)*', shift;
  my @return;
  my $nmatch;

  while (@str1 or @str2) {
    my @pair = map $_ // '', ( shift(@str1), shift(@str2) );
    if ($pair[0] eq $pair[1]) {
      $nmatch++;
    }
    else {
      push @return, $nmatch if $nmatch;
      undef $nmatch;
      push @return, $pair[1];
    }
  }
  push @return, $nmatch if $nmatch;

  return @return;
}

output

["a", 4, "c"]
[5, "c"]
[31, "x", "x", "x", "x", "x", "x", "x", 2, "x", "x", 11]
[2, ""]

Update

To satisfy your request for a comparable recursive solution, this subroutine does the same using a recursive approach. It produces identical except that it dies if offered a pair of strings to compare that have different lengths.

Note that it relies on the data in the original strings being wholly non-numeric. If that isn't the case then the problem becomes more complicated.

Update 2

I have modified recursive_find_diff to handle strings containing numeric characters correctly. It relies on members of the resultant lists all being single characters unless they are a count of matching characters. So I have added a + before all match counts to make them consistently longer than one character and so simple to distinguish.

I am sure all this complication is going to be far slower than the straightforward solution!

use strict;
use warnings;

use Data::Dump;

my $str1 = "aaaaaaaaaaaabbbbbbbbbbbccccccccdddddddddddeeeefffffff";
my $str2 = "aaaaaaaaaaaabbbbbbbbbbbccccccccxxxxxxxddxxeeeefffffff";

dd [ recursive_find_diff( 'xaabbb', 'aaabbc' ) ];
dd [ recursive_find_diff( 'aaabbb', 'aaabbc' ) ];
dd [ recursive_find_diff( $str1, $str2 ) ];
dd [ recursive_find_diff( '111222444888', '11122233488x' ) ];

sub recursive_find_diff {

  my ($str1, $str2) = @_;
  my $len = length $str1;

  die "Strings for comparison must be of equal lengths" unless length $str2 == $len;

  if ($str1 eq $str2) {
    return ( '+'.$len );
  }
  elsif ($len == 1) {
    return $str1 eq $str2 ? ( '+1' ) : ( $str2 );
  }
  else {
    my $half = int($len / 2);
    my @part1 = recursive_find_diff(substr($str1, 0, $half), substr($str2, 0, $half));
    my @part2 = recursive_find_diff(substr($str1, $half), substr($str2, $half));
    if (length $part1[-1] >1 and length $part2[0] > 1) {
      $part2[0] = '+'.($part2[0] + pop @part1);
    }
    return ( @part1, @part2 );
  }
}

output

["a", "+4", "c"]
["+5", "c"]
["+31", "x", "x", "x", "x", "x", "x", "x", "+2", "x", "x", "+11"]
["+6", 3, 3, "+3", "x"]
share|improve this answer
    
This is awesome thanks! I have done some benchmarking with my own version of iterating over all characters, it is significantly faster for short strings, but the recursive split version works well for long strings with few differences. I will post benchmark results tomorrow. –  Sekenre Jul 18 '12 at 17:06
    
@Sekenre: Note that the recursive solution relies on the data in the original strings being wholly non-numeric. If that isn't the case then the problem becomes more complicated. –  Borodin Jul 18 '12 at 17:10
    
That was exactly the problem I was bashing my head against. I will add my solution to the question. –  Sekenre Jul 18 '12 at 17:29
1  
@Sekenre: I have modified recursive_find_diff to handle strings containing numeric characters correctly. I have also benchmarked the two solutions, and on my machine the simple approach is around 2.5 times faster than the recursive one for purely random data. However the recursive solution starts to gain if there are substantial substrings of matching data. If the original two strings are identical then there is no recursion and the solution reduces to a single eq comparison. –  Borodin Jul 18 '12 at 18:24
    
Have added my performance data. –  Sekenre Jul 19 '12 at 13:53
add comment
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Thanks to Borodin and Sodved I have improved my solution to the point that it's pretty fast. Since the strings I am comparing are log-messages that are almost identical apart from changing values, using a recursive solution eliminates a huge amount of work.

As Sodved mentioned, there would not be a similar gain in C since I would still have to do a character-by-character comparison.

What it does now is check that the length of the string is below a certain threshold, and if so, fall back on the array comparison.

Performance looks like this:

                        Rate          long_recurse long_recurse_fallback
long_recurse          1613/s                    --                  -18%
long_recurse_fallback 1961/s                   22%                    --

Here is my final code (with the test strings removed, they're real log messages):

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;
use Benchmark qw(cmpthese);
$Data::Dumper::Indent = 0;
$Data::Dumper::Terse  = 1;

my $str1 = "aaaaaaaaaaaabbbbbbbbbbbccccccccdddddddddddeeeefffffff";
my $str2 = "aaaaaaaaaaaabbbbbbbbbbbccccccccxxxxxxxddxxeeeefffffff";

sub find_diff {
    my ( $a, $b, $minlen ) = @_;
    my $len = length $a;
    if ($len < $minlen) {
        return compress_unpack_ary( $a, $b );
    }
    if ( $len < 2 ) {
        return [ord($b), 0];
    }
    my @rtn = ();
    my $div = $len / 2;
    my $a_1 = substr $a, 0, $div;
    my $b_1 = substr $b, 0, $div;
    if ($a_1 eq $b_1) {
        push @rtn, [length $a_1, 1];
    }
    else {
        push @rtn, find_diff( $a_1, $b_1, $minlen );
    }
    my $a_2 = substr $a, $div;
    my $b_2 = substr $b, $div;
    if ($a_2 eq $b_2) {
        push @rtn, [length $a_2, 1];
    }
    else {
        push @rtn, find_diff( $a_2, $b_2, $minlen );
    }
    return @rtn;
}

sub compress_string {
    my ($a, $b, $minlen) = @_;
    my @list = find_diff($a, $b, $minlen);
    my $acc = 0;
    my @result = ();
    foreach my $item (@list) {
        if ( $item->[1] ) {
            $acc += $item->[0];
        } else {
            while ( $acc > 127 ) {
                push @result, 255;
                $acc -= 127;
            }
            push @result, $acc + 128 if $acc;
            push @result, $item->[0];
            $acc = 0;
        }
    }
    while ( $acc > 127 ) {
        push @result, 255;
        $acc -= 127;
    }
    push @result, $acc + 128 if $acc;
    return pack('C*', @result);
}
sub compress_unpack_ary {
    my ( $a, $b ) = @_;
    my @orig       = unpack('C*', $a);
    my @new        = unpack('C*', $b);
    my @nonmatches = ();
    my $count      = 0;
    my $repeats    = 0;
    while ( $count < scalar @new ) {
        if ( $orig[$count] and $new[$count] == $orig[$count] ) {
            $repeats++;
        }
        elsif ( $repeats == 1 ) {
            push @nonmatches, [ $new[$count - 1], 0], [$new[$count], 0];
            $repeats = 0;
        }
        elsif ( $repeats > 1 ) {
            push @nonmatches, [$repeats, 1];
            $repeats = 0;    # reset counter
            push @nonmatches, [$new[$count], 0];
        }
        else {
            push @nonmatches, [$new[$count], 0];
        }
        $count++;
    }
    if ( $repeats > 0 ) {
        push @nonmatches, [$repeats, 1];
    }
    return @nonmatches;
}
print Data::Dumper::Dumper( [ compress_string( $str1, $str2, 20 ) ] ) . "\n";
print Data::Dumper::Dumper( [ compress_string( $str1, $str2, 0 ) ] ) . "\n";
print Data::Dumper::Dumper( [ compress_string( $long_a, $long_b, 20 ) ] ) . "\n";
print Data::Dumper::Dumper( [ compress_string( $long_a, $long_b, 0 ) ] ) . "\n";

cmpthese(1000, {
        'long_recurse' => sub { compress_string($long_a, $long_b, 0 ) },
        'long_recurse_fallback' => sub { compress_string($long_a, $long_b, 20 ) },
        });
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.