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Context

I have this function which synchronize a list of sites between a table and several remote IIS:

namespace Dashboard.Controllers
{
    public class SiteController : Controller
    {
        public ActionResult Synchronize()
        {
            SiteModel.synchronizeDBWithIIS();

            return Content("Cool.");
        }
    }
}

I want to call this function asynchronously when the dashboard is starting and running.

Questions

  • You advise me to do a $.get() (jQuery) or to use AsyncResult (ASP.NET)?

  • May be use Application_start() in Global.asax?

  • Furthermore, can I improve this controller for synchronization go faster?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

None of the above. This is something that you shouldn't be doing in an ASP.NET application at all. You may read the following article about the dangers of this: http://haacked.com/archive/2011/10/16/the-dangers-of-implementing-recurring-background-tasks-in-asp-net.aspx

This is something that should be done in a separate application. You could use the Windows task scheduler for example to run this application at regular intervals and it will take care of doing this lengthy operation.

There's nothing worse in an ASP.NET application than blocking a worker thread for a long time. The only possible acceptable solution to implement this in an ASP.NET application is to use I/O Completion Ports. Then you could use an AsyncController. But from what I can see your SiteModel.synchronizeDBWithIIS(); is a blocking method so it cannot be done.

But if your SiteModel offered an asynchronous API to perform an I/O intensive task (not CPU intensive) here's how it could be implemented:

public class SiteController : AsyncController
{
    public void SynchronizeAsync()
    {
        AsyncManager.OutstandingOperations.Increment();

        SiteModel.GetHeadlinesCompleted += (sender, e) =>
        {
            AsyncManager.OutstandingOperations.Decrement();
        };

        SiteModel.synchronizeDBWithIISAsync();
    }

    public ActionResult SynchronizeCompleted()
    {
        return Content("Cool.");
    }
}

Once you have done that whether you will invoke the Synchronize action using an AJAX call or a normal call it doesn't really matter. What matters is that this action is now asynchronous and doesn't block a worker thread. It delegates this to the underlying API which at the moment to perform lengthy I/O operations uses the BeginXXX, EndXXX methods on the Streams, Sockets, Database Connections, ... It is important to understand that if your API doesn't already implement this, you cannot just wrap a synchronous method in a new thread or an async delegate and execute it there. I mean you can, but you gain strictly nothing from doing that.

Remark: don't be fooled into thinking that this will make your operation faster. There's no miracles for that. The operation will take exactly the same time as before. It's just that during its execution you won't be jeopardizing ASP.NET worker threads and your other requests will be executed faster.

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Thanks for your help. My SiteModel contains 3 methods: List<SiteModel> getAllSitesFromIIS() (get JSON results from remote API), List<SiteModel> getAllSitesFromDB() (from SQLServer2k8) and void SynchronizeDBWithIIS(). The third method calls the first two. With 2 foreach, I compare the 2 lists and insert/delete/update sites in the DB. What do you mean by a model which offers an asynchronous API to perform an I/O intensive task? –  GG. Jul 18 '12 at 14:55
    
I mean a non blocking method that uses the underlying BeginXXX and EndXXX methods on the network streams, dataabse connections, ... it manipulates. This doesn't seem to be your case so you should really consider off-loading this task from your ASP.NET application. –  Darin Dimitrov Jul 18 '12 at 15:07
    
Agree with Darin except - controllers in MVC 4 are async, you shouldn't use AsyncController. See my tutorial asp.net/mvc/tutorials/mvc-4/… –  RickAnd - MSFT Jul 18 '12 at 17:12

The two are used for different purposes. From what you've described though, it sounds like you'd want to use AsyncResult to asynchronously execute the method calls.

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