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I have a data frame object test that has column names:

> test
       a     b     c     d     e
1  -0.67 -0.02 -0.10 -0.22 -0.32
2   0.46 -1.51 -0.79  0.26  1.19
3   0.22 -0.18 -1.40  0.41 -0.32
4  -2.21  0.79  0.36  1.00 -0.51
5  -0.69  0.39 -0.76 -0.73 -0.43

In this format, I can easily access the columns using the test$b notation. I can convert this to a time series object without difficulty:

test.ts <- ts(test, frequency=<value>, start=<value>

However, once it's a ts object, is there any easy way to access the columns (or rows) by name instead of by column number? The test.ts object still has the column name information, shown by using colnames:

> colnames(test.ts)
[1] "a" "b" "c" "d" "e"

However, test.ts$b doesn't work. Note that by "easily" I mean without writing something ugly like test.ts[,which(colnames(test.ts)=="b"], because that's not easy, that's ugly. Yes, I could write my own function to do that, but I was wondering whether there's a built-in way to do this. Thanks!


As requested:

> dput(head(a))
structure(list(a = c(-0.67, 0.46, 0.22, -2.21, -0.69, -0.45), 
    b = c(-0.02, -1.51, -0.18, 0.79, 0.39, -1.33), c = c(-0.1, 
    -0.79, -1.4, 0.36, -0.76, 0.15), d = c(-0.22, 0.26, 0.41, 
    1, -0.73, -2.23), e = c(-0.32, 1.19, -0.32, -0.51, -0.43, 
    -0.58)), .Names = c("a", "b", "c", "d", "e"), row.names = c(NA, 
6L), class = "data.frame")
share|improve this question
1  
Instead of just displaying test it would be easier for us if you showed the output of the command dput(head(test)). That way, we can just cut and paste it into our R sessions. –  nograpes Jul 18 '12 at 13:48
    
@nograpes - Added. Never knew about that command. –  eykanal Jul 18 '12 at 13:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use the other subsetting syntax:

test.ts[, 'b']
#Time Series:
#Start = 1 
#End = 6 
#Frequency = 1 
#[1] -0.02 -1.51 -0.18  0.79  0.39 -1.33
share|improve this answer
    
I didn't even know there was another subsetting syntax. Thanks! –  eykanal Jul 18 '12 at 14:11
    
?ts says that a ts object is really just a vector or matrix with some extra attributes. You can see that class(unclass(test.ts)) is matrix. So, you can subset it like a matrix (that has colnames) –  GSee Jul 18 '12 at 23:45

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