Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm attempting to build a Jersey web service which will take in data, format it into an XML document, then pass it to another service. I realize that Jersey does have XML support, but I'm having a bit of trouble implementing it due to the required XML structure for the project. The desired output looks something like this:

<root-element>
    <table>
        <row>
            <d>data1</d>
            <d>data2</d>
            <d>data3</d>
        </row>
        <row>
            <d>data4</d>
            <d>data5</d>
            <d>data6</d>
        </row>
    </table>

My issue arises in that there are a variable number of <d> and <row> elements, which will be determined based on the data passed in. I know that I can format a simple table with @XmlRootElement above the class which handles the data, but this may only be useful for my <root-element> since the element only gets populated with other elements. I know I'll need to use some sort of loop to create each <row>, but I'm not sure how I can create each <d> element with different data in each field. Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
Have you checked this tutorial out? vogella.com/articles/REST/article.html –  Hasslarn Jul 18 '12 at 14:03
    
Have I missed something, you just want to write xml? You can just use StAX and iterate over your data. –  TedTrippin Jul 18 '12 at 14:06
    
nvm about my tutorial, didn't read your whole post –  Hasslarn Jul 18 '12 at 14:11
    
@TedTrippin- My problem is not so much with building a general xml document, but rather the repeated portions of the document. I'm most likely going to be using JAXB rather than StAX, though, since it's already included in my Jersey dependencies. –  ZKSteffel Jul 18 '12 at 14:12
    
@Hasslarn- That's actually one of the tutorials I learned Jersey from in the first place. :) It's a good resource, but I just need more details on creating repeated fields in the XML doc. –  ZKSteffel Jul 18 '12 at 14:13

3 Answers 3

You can use a Java model with JAXB (JSR-222) annotations to support your use case. Elements that can occur more than once will correspond to List properties in your Java model. Below is an example of how your document could be mapped.

Table

We will use the @XmlElementWrapper annotation to add a grouping element, and the @XmlElement annotation to set the element name for the items in the collection.

package forum11543081;

import java.util.List;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.*;

@XmlRootElement(name="root-element")
@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)
public class Table {

    @XmlElementWrapper(name="table")
    @XmlElement(name="row")
    private List<Row> rows;

}

Row

If the name of your property/field matches the name of the resulting XML element then you do not require any annotations.

package forum11543081;

import java.util.List;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.*;

@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)
public class Row {

    private List<String> d;

}

Demo

Below is a standalone example to prove that the mapping works:

package forum11543081;

import java.io.File;
import javax.xml.bind.*;

public class Demo {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        JAXBContext jc = JAXBContext.newInstance(Table.class);

        Unmarshaller unmarshaller = jc.createUnmarshaller();
        File xml = new File("src/forum11543081/input.xml");
        Table table = (Table) unmarshaller.unmarshal(xml);

        Marshaller marshaller = jc.createMarshaller();
        marshaller.setProperty(Marshaller.JAXB_FORMATTED_OUTPUT, true);
        marshaller.marshal(table, System.out);
    }

}

input.xml/Output

<root-element>
    <table>
        <row>
            <d>data1</d>
            <d>data2</d>
            <d>data3</d>
        </row>
        <row>
            <d>data4</d>
            <d>data5</d>
            <d>data6</d>
        </row>
    </table>
</root-element>

For More Information

share|improve this answer
    
While this does appear to be a concise way to handle the formatting, which I like, I'm afraid my service will have do conversions that aren't necessarily XML to XML. For the time being, I'm reusing some code from another project to build a dom Document, then build the elements in a looping structure. I'd like to implement something similar to your method, since my current implementation is quite repetitive. As I'm familiar with the Marshaller and Unmarshaller used in your example, would you mind explaining how this could work with different data types (say, a JSON blob or a String array)? –  ZKSteffel Jul 19 '12 at 13:30

If you want to use the default Jersey/JAXB marshalling into XML, you would build a schema reflecting the structure you have indicated which includes collections (unbounded elements) and generate (using xjc) the corresponding java classes. The response from your restful service would be the type associated with the root element and you would build the structure as part of the service. The unbounded elements are rendered as java lists so they can be of arbitrary number of elements. In the code you would just .add(element) as necessary. Something like:

<schema ...>
...
  <element name="root-element">
    <complexType>
      <sequence>
        <element name="table" type="tns:TableType" />
      </sequence>
    </complexType>
  </element>

  <complexType name="TableType">
    <sequence>
      <element name="row" minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="unbounded" type="tns:RowType" />
    </sequence>
  </complexType>

  <complexType name="RowType">
    <sequence>
      <element name="d" minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="unbounded" type="string" />
    </sequence>
  </complexType>
</schema>

The alternate approach would be (as mentioned by TedTrippin) using stax (streaming processor) to build up the xml document tag by tag with loops in appropriate places and returning the final result.

share|improve this answer
    
FYI - You could also start with Java classes, and add JAXB annotations as necessary to match the XML representation: stackoverflow.com/a/11558265/383861 –  Blaise Doughan Jul 19 '12 at 9:56

What I've ended up doing:

Since I had code from another project I could re-use for looping through the XML building, I decided to build the XML in a document, then write that document to a string like so:

public class XmlHandler{
    public static String buildXml(){
        String xmlString="";

        //Create XML Document
        DocumentBuilderFactory docfac = DocumentBuilderFactory.newInstance();
        DocumentBuilder docbuil = null;
        docbuil = docfac.newDocumentBuilder();
        Document doc = docbuil.newDocument();

        //Build XML Elements
        Element root = doc.createElement("root-element");
        doc.appendChild(root);      
        Element table = doc.createElement("table");
        root.appendChild(table);

        //Hard coded data here for testing purposes.
        String[][]array={
        {"data1", "data2", "data3"},
        {"data4", "data5", "data6"}
        };

        Text text = null;
        Element d = null;
        Element row = null;
        for(String[] line : array)
        {
            row=doc.createElement("row");
            table.appendChild(row);
            for(String label : line)
            {
                d = doc.createElement("d");
                row.appendChild(d);
                text = doc.createTextNode(label);
                d.appendChild(text);
                }
            }
        }

        //Write Document to String
        DOMImplementationLS domImplLS = (DOMImplementationLS) doc.getImplementation();
        LSSerializer serializer = domImplLS.createLSSerializer();
        serializer.getDomConfig().setParameter("format-pretty-print", true);
        LSOutput output = domImplLS.createLSOutput();
        output.setEncoding("UTF-8");
        StringWriter sw = new StringWriter();
        output.setCharacterStream(sw);
        serializer.write(doc, output);
        xmlString = sw.toString();

        return xmlString;
    }
}

While the hard coded String array won't be around for long, just until I find out what data types I need to pass in, this class is doing the trick just fine.

share|improve this answer
    
I noticed somebody marked this as "Not Useful". Could you explain why? Realize, also, that I do not yet know what data types the service will be passed, so this code will need to be optimized accordingly. –  ZKSteffel Jul 20 '12 at 13:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.