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In c#, when I want to remove some items from a list, i do it in the following way,

List<Item> itemsToBeRemoved = new List<Item>();
foreach(Item item in myList)
{
   if (IsMatching(item)) itemsToBeRemoved.Add(item);
}

foreach(Item item in itemsToBeRemoved)
{
   myList.Remove(item);
}

Is there any better way to do it?

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, senia, fotanus, Jan Turoň, carlosfigueira Jun 5 '13 at 23:39

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
prefer solutions in c# 2.0 without LINQ. thanks! –  gilbertc Jul 20 '09 at 15:50

7 Answers 7

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Well, you could call the method that does exactly what you want.

myList.RemoveAll(IsMatching);

Generally it is "better" to use the method that does exactly what you want rather than re-inventing it yourself.

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obviously I have overlooked this method.. thanks!! –  gilbertc Jul 20 '09 at 15:57
myList.RemoveAll(x=> IsMatching(x));
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5  
And if you want, you don't even have to use the lambda. The compiler will automatically convert "IsMatching" to Predicate<T>. –  Eric Lippert Jul 20 '09 at 15:50
    
+1 But this not LINQ, this is just method on List<T>. –  Mike Chaliy Jul 20 '09 at 15:50
1  
Also, why do you say "if you can use LINQ"? What does this have to do with LINQ? –  Eric Lippert Jul 20 '09 at 15:50
    
Sorry, I was halfway typing up another version of my answer, when I replaced it with this. Forgot to remove the intro. –  Brandon Jul 20 '09 at 15:52
    
Following his example, I think you want myList, rather than itemsToBeRemoved. Still, good answer, +1 –  Matt Grande Jul 20 '09 at 15:53

Here's a bit of an improvement using Linq.

var itemsToRemove = myList.Where(item => IsMatching(item)).ToList();
foreach(Item item in itemsToBeRemoved)
{
   myList.Remove(item);
}
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How about reverting your logic, adding items which doesn't match and just use the result collection?

List<Item> itemsTaken = new List<Item>();
foreach(Item item in myList)
{
   if (!IsMatching(item)) itemsTaken.Add(item);
}

// use itemsTaken as if it were myList with items removed
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that depends on the ratio of number of items to be removed and items to be retained in the list. –  gilbertc Jul 20 '09 at 15:49

What I used to do is the create a reverse for-loop:

for (int i=myList.Count-1; i>=0; i--)
{
  if (IsMatching(myList[i]))
    myList.RemoveAt(i);
}

But I'm sure there are more elegant ways using LINQ.

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Why a downvote? This works! –  M4N Jul 20 '09 at 15:55
    
I got downvoted too! What the frig! –  Matt Grande Jul 20 '09 at 20:51

Similar to what Jakers said, and assuming you are on .Net 3:

myList = myList.Where(item => !IsMatching(item)).ToList();
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foreach(Item singleItem in new List<Item>(allItems))
{
  if(IsMatching(singleItem))
     allItems.Remove(singleItem);
}
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I could be wrong, but I didn't think you could modify an array while iterating over it using foreach. –  Matt Grande Jul 20 '09 at 15:57
4  
He's not modifying it. He's made a copy, is iterating over the copy, and is modifying the original. –  Eric Lippert Jul 20 '09 at 16:03
    
Ahh, so he is. Didn't notice that the first time. –  Matt Grande Jul 20 '09 at 20:54

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