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I have a giant table something like this:

Date   Price1   Price2
1      13       14.9
2      13.1     NULL
3      NULL     14
4      NULL     14.5
5      13       14

I want to fill the NAs so that my table in SQL looks like the following:

Date   Price1   Price2
1      13       14.9
2      13.1     14.9
3      13.1     14
4      13.1     14.5
5      13       14

I am really new to SQL so please excuse me. I searched here and it seems like you can do this in R but how should I do it in SQL.

I am using Microsoft SQL Server Management. Also I cant seem to figure how to properly insert a table and they would not let me post the pics. So, sorry about the formatting.

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How do you decide which value to put instead of NA? I see that you replaced Price1 NAs with 13.1 and Price2 NAs with 14.9, but how did you come up with this exact numbers? From last Price before date? –  Nikola Markovinović Jul 18 '12 at 14:15
    
If it is NA, replace it with last days available price. –  user1243255 Jul 18 '12 at 14:23
    
Well, then answer provided by @Chandu will do the job, unless you are on Sql Server 2000. –  Nikola Markovinović Jul 18 '12 at 14:25
    
I am using Microsoft SQL Server 2012. Also I noticed in my tables it is not N/A it is NULL rather. So, I am trying to figure out why it is not working. –  user1243255 Jul 18 '12 at 14:39
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1 Answer

Try this:

UPDATE a
  SET a.Price1 = b.Price1
  FROM <YOUR-TABLE> a CROSS APPLY 
    (
        SELECT TOP 1 Price1
          FROM <YOUR-TABLE> b
        WHERE a.Date > b.Date
          AND Price1 <> 'NA'
            ORDER BY b.Date DESC
    ) b

    UPDATE a
  SET a.Price2 = b.Price2
  FROM <YOUR-TABLE> a CROSS APPLY 
    (
        SELECT TOP 1 Price2
          FROM <YOUR-TABLE> b
        WHERE a.Date > b.Date
          AND Price2 <> 'NA'
            ORDER BY b.Date DESC
    ) b
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And then repeat, for the entire table, every time you change a row. Blecch. –  Aaron Bertrand Jul 18 '12 at 14:17
    
@Aaron Bertrand: how do I that? I am a beginner so please bear with me. –  user1243255 Jul 18 '12 at 14:24
1  
You would use a trigger, but by no means am I suggesting that. Wouldn't it be sufficient to populate those columns when you query the data instead of storing it that way? You could so this in a query or at your presentation tier without ever having to run an update or maintain this dependent-on-other-rows data. –  Aaron Bertrand Jul 18 '12 at 14:27
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