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I am getting a following exception while enumerating through a queue:

System.InvalidOperationException: Collection was modified; enumeration operation may not execute

here is the code excerpt:

1:    private bool extractWriteActions(out List<WriteChannel> channelWrites)
2:    {
3:        channelWrites = new List<WriteChannel>();
4:        foreach (TpotAction action in tpotActionQueue)
5:        {
6:            if (action is WriteChannel)
7:            {
8:                channelWrites.Add((WriteChannel)action);
9:                lock(tpotActionQueue)
10:               {
11:                  action.Status = RecordStatus.Batched;
12:               }
13:           }
14:       }
15:       return (channelWrites.Count > 0);
16:   }

I think I understand the problem - altering the hashtable at action.Status = RecordStatus.Batched, which screws up the MoveNext() on enumerator. Question is, how do I implement that "pattern" correctly?

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4  
Why are you locking the queue? This code makes no sense to me. –  Eric Lippert Jul 20 '09 at 15:54
    
@Kermit_xc: The bigger point from the enumerator documentation is this "The enumerator does not have exclusive access to the collection; therefore, enumerating through a collection is intrinsically not a thread-safe procedure. To guarantee thread safety during enumeration, you can lock the collection during the entire enumeration. To allow the collection to be accessed by multiple threads for reading and writing, you must implement your own synchronization." –  Stan R. Jul 20 '09 at 16:22
    
Right. This code does not do anything even vaguely like that. –  Eric Lippert Jul 20 '09 at 20:11
    
Consider using a reader-writer lock if you need to synchronize readers and writers on multiple threads. –  Eric Lippert Jul 20 '09 at 20:12
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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are allowed to change the value in an item in a collection. The error you're getting means that an item was either added or removed i.e.: the collection itself was modified, not an item inside the collection. This is most likely caused by another thread adding or removing items to this collection.

You should lock your queue at the beginning of your method, to prevent other Threads modifying the collection while you are accessing it. Or you could lock the collection before even calling this method.

private bool extractWriteActions(out List<WriteChannel> channelWrites)
    {
      lock(tpotActionQueue)
      {
        channelWrites = new List<WriteChannel>();
        foreach (TpotAction action in tpotActionQueue)
        {
            if (action is WriteChannel)
            {
                channelWrites.Add((WriteChannel)action);

                  action.Status = RecordStatus.Batched;

           }
        }
      }
       return (channelWrites.Count > 0);
   }
share|improve this answer
    
dang! - just verified, got a different thread pushing elements on the collection, pops are thread-safe though. Am a little worried about the 'lock' performance on the whole iteration though. It's pretty time sensitive - it might need complete rework :{. Thanks though! –  kermit_xc Jul 20 '09 at 16:06
    
@kermit_xs: "just verified, got a different thread pushing elements on the collection" - that's your issue right there. changing from "foreach" to "for" loop is not your problem and is not the answer. when using foreach you need to lock your collection before the enumeration. Enumerators are not thread-safe. –  Stan R. Jul 20 '09 at 17:05
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I think I had a similar exception when using a foreach loop on a Collection where I tried to remove items from the Collection (or it may have been a List, I can't remember). I ended up getting around it by using a for loop. Perhaps try something like the following:

for (int i=0; i<tpotActionQueue.Count(); i++)
{
    TpotAction action = tpotActionQueue.Dequeue();
    if (action is WriteChannel)
    {
        channelWrites.Add((WriteChannel)action);
        lock(tpotActionQueue)
        {
            action.Status = RecordStatus.Batched;
        }
    }
}
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yes, but this method is not removing or adding items to a collection. The problem is outside of this method. –  Stan R. Jul 20 '09 at 16:06
    
Thanks a lot, it does make sense ... will give it a shot. –  kermit_xc Jul 20 '09 at 16:09
    
No Stan the problem is the action.Status assignment, read the enumeration documentation for any collection. "An enumerator remains valid as long as the collection remains unchanged. If changes are made to the collection, such as adding, modifying, or deleting elements, the enumerator is irrecoverably invalidated and its behavior is undefined". Here he's modifying an element –  SpaceghostAli Jul 20 '09 at 16:10
    
you've never used foreach to initialize a list? List<Test> t = new List<Test>(); t.Add(new Test()); t.Add(new Test()); foreach (Test item in t) { item.SomeName = "SomeTest"; } –  Stan R. Jul 20 '09 at 16:14
    
this worked perfectly... thanks a lot this saved me a lot of headache! –  jes9582 May 26 '11 at 12:51
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You don't have a definition for tpotActionQueue, but if it's just a normal List<TpotAction> then that line is not your problem. Modifying the collection is adding or removing members - not setting a property on a contained object.

You have a lock(tpotActionQueue) and a tag of thread-safety, so my guess is there's another thread adding or removing items from tpotActionQueue while you're enumerating. You probably need to synchronize those accesses.

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that was my idea - modifying the value shouldn't screw up the collection. Ultimately I wanted to remove it from the queue, but instead chose to mark it as 'batched' so it can be taken care outside, in the main queue loop - it's the same thread though. –  kermit_xc Jul 20 '09 at 16:12
    
setting a property does count, msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/4a9449ty.aspx –  SpaceghostAli Jul 20 '09 at 16:15
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I think all you need to do is stop using the foreach and instead switch it over to a for loop

for(int i = 0; i < tpotActionQueue.Length; i++)
{
     TpotAction action = tpotActionQueue[i];

     if (action is WriteChannel)
     {
        channelWrites.Add((WriteChannel)action);
        lock(tpotActionQueue)
        {
           action.Status = RecordStatus.Batched;
        }
     }
}

Regards, Mike.

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this will still cause a problem in a multi-threaded environment, it seems tpotActionQueue is a "global" variable, and another thread might modify it while this method is being called. –  Stan R. Jul 20 '09 at 16:00
    
also, you're allowed to change an item in a collection, so I don't see the point of this. –  Stan R. Jul 20 '09 at 16:08
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I think you must have some other thread modifying the tpotActionQueue while you're iterating over it. Since you're only locking that queue inside the for loop this is possible.

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How about some LINQy goodness?

private bool extractWriteActions(out List<WriteChannel> channelWrites)
{

   channelWrites= tpotActionQueue.Where<WriteChannel>(x => x is WriteChannel).ToList()

   foreach(WriteChannel channel in channelWrites) {
      channel.Status = RecordStatus.Batched;
   }

  return ( channelWrites.Count > 0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
can't do LINQ - .NET 3.0 max. But good one :) –  kermit_xc Jul 20 '09 at 18:04
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