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I have 10 files with 100 random numbers named randomnumbers(1-10).py. I want to create a program which says "congratulations" when a string of 123 is found and count the number of times 123 shows up as well. I have the "congratulations" part and I have written code for the counting part but I always get zero as a result. What's wrong?

for j in range(0,10):
n = './randomnumbers' + str(j) + '.py'          
s='congradulations' 
z='123' 
def replacemachine(n, z, s):
    file = open(n, 'r')             
    text=file.read()    
    file.close()    
    file = open(n, 'w') 
    file.write(text.replace(z, s))
    file.close()
    print "complete"
replacemachine(n, z, s) 
count = 0
if 'z' in n:
    count = count + 1
else:
    pass
print count
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Was my answer helpful? –  Daniel Li Oct 2 '12 at 17:01
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2 Answers 2

if 'z' in n is testing to see if the literal string 'z' is in the filename n. Since you only open the file within replacemachine, you can't access the file contents from outside.

Best solution would be to just count the occurrences from within replacemachine:

def replacemachine(n, z, s):
    file = open(n, 'r')
    text=file.read()
    file.close()
    if '123' in text:
        print 'number of 123:', text.count('123')
    file = open(n, 'w')
    file.write(text.replace(z, s))
    file.close()
    print "complete"

Then you don't need that code after replacemachine(n, z, s).

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consider:

some_file_as_string = """\
184312345294839485949182
57485348595848512493958123
5948395849258574827384123
8594857241239584958312"""

num_found = some_file_as_string.count('123')
if num_found > 0:
    print('num found: {}'.format(num_found))
else:
    print('no matches found')

Doing an '123' in some_file_as_string is a little wasteful, because it still needs to look through the entire string. You might as well count anyway and do something when the count returns more than 0.

You also have this

if 'z' in n:
    count = count + 1
else:
    pass
print count

Which is asking if the string 'z' is present, you should be checking for z the variable instead (without the quote)

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