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I am trying to pick out the optimal set of colors for a new website project.

I want to do a traditional black on white look and feel for the main content. However my partner on the project wants to do a color combination that more looks like the traditional Windows Forms look and feel.

Is there any research available on the best color combination's to use for readability, ease of use, and reduced eye strain?

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closed as not constructive by Robaticus, casperOne May 22 '12 at 14:18

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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No matter what colours you choose, I would recommend that you implement something to make them changeable, whether that be a user interface, or just a note in a config file, make sure that it's not impossible to change. You might find that your user base enjoys pastels FAR more than the average person. Or that they're offended by the colour maroon. Always be able to change your colour scheme. –  DevinB Jul 20 '09 at 17:02
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This is programming related and this belongs here. Color schemes are part of usability and human-computer interaction, which is part of software engineering, and topics of software engineering have a direct impact on software development. –  Thomas Owens Jul 20 '09 at 17:06
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Agreed, user interaction is definitely within the programming scope of topics. –  Danny Jul 20 '09 at 17:44
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Yet another example of the close nazi mentality –  Tim Jul 20 '09 at 19:21
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Belongs in ux.stackexchange.com –  Robaticus May 22 '12 at 13:03

11 Answers 11

up vote 7 down vote accepted
  • Here are some tips and a study on color-scheming for the color-blind or visually impaired.
  • If you want to use complementary colors, or more than two colors, here are some good guidelines [pdf].
  • Here are some tools from the NIST to automatically evaluate website usability.
  • Dr. Ralph Wilson recommends "Few colors with lots of white space" (see details under point #5).

And if the above just will not do, this page has more useful Links than the entire Zelda series.

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Ironically, those links makes my eyes hurt :) –  cwap Jul 20 '09 at 16:44
    
I guess they want you to go through it so your readers don't have to :P –  Daniel F. Thornton Jul 20 '09 at 17:01
    
@Meeh is right; that last link in particular is atrocious. The fact that it's about user interface design and usability is fantastically ironic. –  Andrew Jul 29 '09 at 5:32
    
+1 for legend of Zelda reference. –  Akshat Jiwan Sharma Jan 31 at 15:20

I would recommend Kuler to find which color scheme to use on your site. If you search for "Windows" on that site you will get some windows schemes that you might want to use.... generally speaking from a marketing aspect, white backgrounds tend to be more accepted than backgrounds with a specific color.

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You might also consider using a color matcher ,

I use it and find it very helpful to find complementary color that make your text readable and you design make sense.

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White strains my eyes really badly I find.

When it comes to vast amounts of text I typically prefer black on off-white. Some very light shade of gray. Still plenty easy to read, but not burning my retinas.

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+1 I find black on white to be quite an eyestrain, too. It's like looking at snow in bright sunshine. I tend to tone down the background to a medium shade of grey. In my IDEs, I use a black background with mostly mid shade colours for the text. –  RobH Jul 20 '09 at 17:33

You can always check your decisions to make sure they are ADA compliant. This is a good place to start

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Black text on an off white background works for me. And no background image or color on the desktop

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I read about a study that concluded that the readability of a particular color scheme is dependent on the subject's personality. In fact, it was found that some people with a reading disability were instantly able to read faster once a color filter was placed over the pages on a book. I suggest you pick a color scheme that you find easiest on the eyes, and make the font a reasonable size. Something to avoid is the color yellow. The same study found that yellow is a generally irritating color to most people, so even if you find it easy on the eyes, your audience might not. Some people find darker backgrounds easier on the eyes, but if your audience isn't already using their own color scheme, your site will be seen a nuisance, since most of the web is dark-on-light.

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Windows Forms look will only keep visitors who like that look. So say goodbye to all the Mac, Linux, and other Windows haters.

Personally, I prefer black on white.

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There aresome resources out there that explain the topic.

As a rule, you should avoid black background with white text, it's anoying to a lot of people.

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in the past I liked vert much turbo pascal 7 default color scheme: yellow on blue. I'm not sure about it's scientific relevance however I think it is better than black on white.

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I personaly use C0DCC0 (greenish) instead of white for background color in windows. Easy on the eyes when you have to stare at the screen whole day. Consider this to be one datasample study :).

(Imagine my disgust at OSX with fixed colors...)

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