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I have a simple question.

When I create a python TCPServer for example using the example code :

import sys, SocketServer, os
from multiprocessing import Pool, Queue

class MyTCPHandler(SocketServer.BaseRequestHandler):
    def handle(self):
                # self.request is the TCP socket connected to the client
                self.data = self.request.recv(1024).strip()
                print "{} wrote:".format(self.client_address[0])
                print self.data
                # just send back the same data, but upper-cased
                self.request.sendall(self.data.upper())


if __name__ == '__main__':

    pool = Pool(processes=2)

    HOST, PORT = "localhost", 9999
    server = SocketServer.TCPServer((HOST,PORT), MyTCPHandler )
    server.serve_forever()

My question is : How can i pass to the function handle on the Class MyTCPHandler the Object Pool ?

Thanks

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you should consider a higher level library like twisted and spare the pain of dealing with plain sockets. You won't regret. –  Paulo Scardine Jul 18 '12 at 16:35
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1 Answer

If you want to have a multithreading TCPServer you can use the ThreadingMixIn mixin class like this:

import SocketServer

class ThreadedTCPServer(SocketServer.ThreadingMixIn, SocketServer.TCPServer):
    pass

You can also have a fork based TCPServer by using ForkingMixIn in the same way as before.

More info can be found in the doc.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I want to have multithreading. But I want to control the threads generated. Any tips how can i do that ? –  Jorge Machado Jul 18 '12 at 16:47
    
@JorgeMachado: You can check the code of ThreadingMixIn (hg.python.org/cpython/file/227a22288688/Lib/…) and you can create your own Mixin like the one offered by standard library and use it instead. –  mouad Jul 18 '12 at 16:50
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