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We've all heard the warnings that if you invoke undefined behaviour in C or C++, anything at all can happen.

Is this limited to any runtime behaviour at all, or does this also include any compile-time behaviour? In particular, is a compiler, upon encountering a construct that invokes undefined behaviour, allowed to reject the code (in the absence of other requirements in the standard to do so), or even to crash?

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Check out the "recommended" compiler flags for GCC: -Wall -Wextra -Wconversion -pedantic. They will help you detect most of the nasty stuff... –  Mihai Todor Jul 18 '12 at 16:40
    
The linker will complain if you violate the one definition rule, and that rule declaree its violation to be UB IIRC. –  Xeo Jul 18 '12 at 16:40
    
@Xeo don't mention the linker:( I'm sure I'm not the only one who has much, much more trouble with linking than compiling. It often seems like linking defines 'undefined behaviour' <g> –  Martin James Jul 18 '12 at 21:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

"You're all ignoring the actual definition and focusing on the note, The standard imposes no requirements." - @R.MartinhoFernandes

The message above was written by the given user in Lounge<C++> and makes a very valid argument; the standard doesn't impose any requirements when it comes to code that invokes undefined behavior.


! ! !

undefined-behavior stretches even to the far corner of parsing the input data (ie. code) by the compiler, as verified with the below quotations from both the C++11 and C99 standards.

To answer your question with one sentence;

  • undefined behavior is not limited to runtime execution, and it's permissible to crash during compilation "in a documented manner characteristic of the environment" 1

"in a documented manner characteristic of the environment" is a kind of odd statement, you could pretty much write a compiler documenting that it might crash upon any given code (that's invalid) to grant it the possibility to crash whenever it wants to.

1. quote from the C++11/C99 standards


1.3.24 [defns.undefined]

Undefined behavior; behavior for which this International Standard imposes no requirements

[ Note:

Undefined behavior may be expected when this International Standard omits any explicit definition of behavior or when a program uses an erroneous construct or erroneous data.

Permissible undefined behavior ranges from ignoring the situation completely with unpredictable results, to behaving during translation or program execution in a documented manner characteristic of the environment (with or without the issuance of a diagnostic message), to terminating a translation or execution (with the issuance of a diagnostic message).

Many erroneous program constructs do not engender undefined behavior; they are required to be diagnosed.

end note ]


3.4.3 - Undefined Behavior

  1. behavior, upon use of a nonportable or erroneous program construct or of erroneous data, for which this >International Standard imposes no requirements

  2. NOTE Possible undefined behavior ranges from ignoring the situation completely with unpredictable results, to behaving during translation or program execution in a documented manner characteristic of the environment (with or without the issuance of a diagnostic message), to terminating a translation or execution (with the issuance of a diagnostic message).

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2  
"in a documented manner characteristic" doesn't make sense as a fragment; it only makes sense as "in a documented manner characteristic of the environment". I'd read this as saying that a compiler should behave in the same way as other programs on the platform; writing to stderr on Unix, or displaying a dialog box on Windows. –  ecatmur Jul 18 '12 at 17:17
    
@ecatmur noted, I'll update the post. –  Filip Roséen - refp Jul 18 '12 at 17:21

If the behavior is undefined, the compiler could accept it, reject it, issue a warning, but, though not in the standard, a compiler should never crash because of an invalid input.

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-1. this is wrong, see other answers quoting the standard (such as the one written by me with quotes from both C99 and C++11) –  Filip Roséen - refp Jul 18 '12 at 16:51
2  
Which part is wrong? Accept it=ignoring the situation completely, reject it=terminating translation with issuance of a diagnostic message, issue a warning=accept with issuance etc. –  AlexDev Jul 18 '12 at 16:54
    
Unless you mean terminating translation=crash, which I don't think is what the OP intended. –  AlexDev Jul 18 '12 at 16:56
    
it implies that the standard says that it shouldn't crash with bad input, that's how me and a few friends interpret it at least. –  Filip Roséen - refp Jul 18 '12 at 16:56
    
@refp I edited the answer –  AlexDev Jul 18 '12 at 17:02

It is not limited to run-time behavior. Per ISO/IEC 14882, first edition, 1998-09-01, 1.3.12, in a note (so non-normative): “permissible undefined behavior ranges from... to behaving during translation or programming execution in a documented manner characteristic of the environment”. In other words, the standard says the implementation may do anything the operating system (or other environment) permits, provided it is documented.

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I always love Standard quotes, so if that's what you're looking for, the standard defines undefined behaviour as

behavior for which this International Standard imposes no requirements

[Note: Undefined behavior may be expected when this International Standard omits any explicit definition of behavior for when a program uses an erroneous construct or erroneous data. Permissible undefined behavior ranges from ignoring the situation completely with unpredictable results, to behaving during translation or program execution in a documented manner characteristic of the environment (with or without the issuance of a diagnostic message), to terminating a translation or execution (with the issuance of a diagnostic message). Many erroneous program constructs do not engender undefined behavior; they are required to be diagnosed. —end note ]

And "translation" is basically going from source to the end product (assembly or whatever). So we can mix those two possibilities and get

ignoring the situation completely with unpredictable results during translation

So yes, the compiler is free to exhibit undefined behaviour during compilation as well as at runtime.

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I don't see how this allows undefined behaviour at compile time. "Ignoring the situation with completely unpredictable results" seems to apply only to runtime behaviour. "Behaving during translation or program execution in a documented manner" seems to exclude a crash. –  HighCommander4 Jul 18 '12 at 17:04
    
@HighCommander4 the key words are "from ... to ..." which means those are only examples and anything between the two, or any combination of the two, or whatever, can happen. –  Seth Carnegie Jul 18 '12 at 17:05

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