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I'm trying to reduce duplicate sqlite code in my object. To do so I wanted one method that had the sqlite interaction and just return a sqlite3_stmt. My problem is that the sqlite3_stmt pointer is always null. My question is, am I doing something wrong or can this not be done with sqlite?

Usage:

SqliteIO sqldb;
string GET_CONFIG = "select* from config; ";
sqlite3_stmt *statement;
assert(sqldb.sqlForResults(GET_CONFIG, statement));
assert(statement != NULL); //this fails

Method:

bool SqliteIO::sqlForResults(string pSql, sqlite3_stmt *statement ){
bool lbRetVal=false;

if(mDB == NULL){
    cerr << "No database to query";
    Logger::error("SqlliteIO::getAllScheuled() null database handle");
} else {
    sqlite3_busy_timeout(mDB, 2000);
    if(sqlite3_prepare_v2(mDB, pSql.c_str(), -1, &statement, 0) == SQLITE_OK) {
        lbRetVal = true;
    }
    string error = sqlite3_errmsg(mDB);
    if(error != "not an error"){
        cerr << pSql << " " << error << endl;
        Logger::error("SqlliteIO::sqlForResults() "+ error + " " +pSql  );
    }
}
return lbRetVal;
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2 Answers 2

sqlite3_stmt *statement; // this never gets initialized
assert(sqldb.sqlForResults(GET_CONFIG, statement));
assert(statement != NULL); //this fails

the statement variable in that block of code never gets initialized (you're passing a copy of it to sqlForResults()).

frankly, you're lucky that assertion is failing, as statement could have any garbage value (I'm guessing variables are zero-initialized in debug mode for your compiler)

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this really doesn't answer the question. Even if it was initialized to null I still don't get a result set back from the method. –  Jim Jul 18 '12 at 17:49
    
how doesn't it? statement is never set to anything! inside of sqlForResults, the parameter 'statement' is set to something, but that doesn't affect the variable 'statement' in the other stack frame. You'd need to pass by reference or pointer-to-pointer to do that. –  Bwmat Jul 20 '12 at 1:33

The statement parameter of SqliteIO::sqlForResults() needs to have the type sqlite3_stmt**, not sqlite3_stmt*. So the call site would now look like:

SqliteIO sqldb;
string GET_CONFIG = "select* from config; ";
sqlite3_stmt *statement = NULL;
assert(sqldb.sqlForResults(GET_CONFIG, &statement));

Without the reference/address-of operator & before statement (like in the original question), you would be passing the value of statement to sqlForResults, which was NULL or 0 in this case. The relevant changes in sqlForResults are:

bool SqliteIO::sqlForResults(string pSql, sqlite3_stmt **statement ){
bool lbRetVal=false;

if(mDB == NULL){
    // ...
} else {
    // ...
    if(sqlite3_prepare_v2(mDB, pSql.c_str(), -1, statement, 0) == SQLITE_OK) {
        // ...
    }
    // ...
}
return lbRetVal;

The parameter list now accepts a sqlite_stmt** arg, and we pass that directly to sqlite3_prepare_v2. In the original question, sqlForResults passed &statement to sqlite3_prepare_v2 - which is the address of the statement parameter for this SqliteIO::sqlForResults method call - which isn't what you want.

I know this is an old question, but I hope this helps.

EDIT: for clarity and to elude some more code from sqlForResults

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