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Suppose you have the following code

template<typename T,void (T::*m)(int)>
    struct B{

    void f(T* a,int x){
        (a->*m)(x);
    }
};


struct A{


   template<typename X> void f(int){
  }

   void wrap(int i){
     f<char>(i);
   }

   B<A,&A::f<char> > y;
};


int main(){
   A a;
}

This definition

B<A,&A::f<char> > y;

works with gcc,but not with Visual studio 2010:

error C2440: 'specialization' : cannot convert from 'overloaded-function' to 'void (__thiscall A::* )(int)'

On the contrary,

 B<A,&f<char> > y;

works with visual studio but not with gcc.

Note that B<A,&A::f<char> > y; placed in the main, i.e.

  int main(){
       B<A,&A::f<char> > y;
    }

works for VS as well.

IS B<A,&f<char> > y; not standard? is there a way (apart wrapping the template function) to make the thing compile with both compilers?

===EDIT====

A possible, dirty solution is

#ifdef _WIN32
#define vsFix(a,b) b
#else
#define vsFix(a,b) a::b
#endif

 B<A,&vsFix(A,f)<char> > y;
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1  
Just for the sanity of readers, you should post the actual pieces of code that compile/don't in the different compilers (i.e. rather than saying *B<A,&A::f<char> > y; placed in main works for VS, add that as part of your test code –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 18 '12 at 16:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

IS B<A,&f<char> > y; not standard?

No. &f<char> is a pointer to function, not pointer to member function.

is there a way (apart wrapping the template function) to make the thing compile with both compilers?

Yes, by fixing the types, and passing pointer to object of type A :

template<typename T,void (T::*m)(int)>
struct B{

    void f(T* a,int x){
        (a->*m)(x);
    }
};


struct A{

   template<typename X> void f(int){
  }

   void wrap(int i){
     y.f(this, i);
   }

   B< A, &A::f<int> > y;
};


int main(){
   A a;
   a.wrap(5);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I would like to suggest that you check out std::function and using it to pass functions. –  std''OrgnlDave Jul 18 '12 at 16:53
    
@BЈовић:This does not compile in VS 2010, but I then wonder if the compiling function is actually buggy then. @ std''OrgnlDave thank you, that may be a good direction, though it'd bring in C++11, isn't it? –  Fabio Dalla Libera Jul 18 '12 at 16:56
    
@FabioDallaLibera Sorry, I haven't tried to compile. The above code compiles fine. But as suggested, you can use lambdas and std::function –  BЈовић Jul 18 '12 at 18:57
    
I will. thank you –  Fabio Dalla Libera Jul 19 '12 at 7:01

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