Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The parent:

@ExceptionHandler(NoUserException.class)
protected ModelAndView handleException(NoUserException e) {
    Map<String, Object> model = new HashMap<String, Object>();

    model.put(ModelKeys.HOST_KEY, "message");

    return new ModelAndView("noAccess",model);
}

The child:

@ExceptionHandler(NoUserException.class)
protected void handleException(NoUserException e, HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) throws IOException {
    logger.error("Invalid user.");
    respond(CLIENT_USER_ERROR,response);
}

Yes, I do need them to have different parameters and outputs.

share|improve this question
    
what do you mean? It's some code in the parent class... it's just a simple throw new NoUserException() –  Nate Spector Jul 18 '12 at 16:48
    
it isnt? it's happening when i run it. it cant decide which method to use. –  Nate Spector Jul 18 '12 at 16:53
    
Probably because there are two @ExceptionHandlers being defined, one inherited from the superclass and the new one being defined in the subclass. Not sure how to override it, it won't happen automatically because the methods don't have the same signature. –  purtip31 Jul 18 '12 at 16:57

2 Answers 2

You can't have two methods with the same exception handler, sorry, it just isn't supported. The code that resolves them does not discern between super-subclasses and consider the subclass "more specific." The code is in org.springframework.web.servlet.mvc.annotation.AnnotationMethodHandlerExceptionResolver if you're interested. It would not be hard to make your own implementation of AbstractHandlerExceptionResolver based on that one that does consider a method directly on the controller a more specific result than an inherited method.

edit: personal comment, I have found over time it is better for me to suppress the urge to use "inheritance as templating tool" when making Spring MVC annotation driven controllers. View code is inherently clunky and procedural at times, this is why we make a separate "view layer" in the first place. An overly-micro approach to DRY and "re-use" does not avail you here. If it violates Liskov Substitution Principle, I don't do it. YMMV of course.

share|improve this answer

Why not just delegate the implementation of handleException() to another method?

// superclass
protected ModelAndView handleExceptionImpl(
        NoUserException e,
        HttpServletResponse response) {
    Map<String, Object> model = new HashMap<String, Object>();
    model.put(ModelKeys.HOST_KEY, "message");
    return new ModelAndView("noAccess",model);
}

@ExceptionHandler(NoUserException.class)
protected ModelAndView handleException(
        NoUserException e,
        HttpServletResponse response) {
    return handleExceptionImpl(e, response);
}

// subclass
@Override
protected ModelAndView handleExceptionImpl(
        NoUserException e,
        HttpServletResponse response) {
    logger.error("Invalid user.");
    respond(CLIENT_USER_ERROR,response);
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.