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In the following code:

template <typename T>
class CRTP
{
public:
};

template <int I, typename T>
class CRTPInt
{
public:
};

template <template <typename> class T>
class Derived : public T<Derived<T>>
{
public:
};

void main()
{
Derived<CRTP> foo;
Derived<CRTPInt<2>> foo2;
}

How do I write CRPTInt so I can pass in a templatized parameter that will then be continued in the Derived definition?

Thanks,

Jim

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The CRTP pattern is typically used to enable static polymorphism and the ability to mixin (parametrized) behavior. To illustrate two alternatives, it's convenient to first define a general template

template
<
        typename Derived
>
class enable_down_cast
{
private:
        // typedefs

        typedef enable_down_cast Base;

public:
        Derived const* self() const
        {
                // casting "down" the inheritance hierarchy
                return static_cast<Derived const*>(this);
        }

        // write the non-const version in terms of the const version
        // Effective C++ 3rd ed., Item 3 (p. 24-25)
        Derived* self()
        {
                return const_cast<Derived*>(static_cast<Base const*>(this)->self());
        }

protected:
        // disable deletion of Derived* through Base*
        // enable deletion of Base* through Derived*
        ~enable_down_cast() = default; // C++11 only, use ~enable_down_cast() {} in C++98
};

Then you define an interface class template for the type of behavior that you want

template<typename FX>
class FooInterface
:
    // enable static polymorphism
    public enable_down_cast< FX >
{
private:
    // dependent name now in scope
    using enable_down_cast< FX >::self;

public:
    // interface
    void foo() { self()->do_foo(); }

protected:
    // disable deletion of Derived* through Base*
    // enable deletion of Base* through Derived*
    ~IFooInterface() = default; // C++11 only, use ~IFooInterface() {} in C++98/03
};

To get different implementations of this interface, simply define different classes that each derive from FooInterface with themselves as curiously recurring template parameters:

class FooImpl
:
    public FooInterface< FooImpl > 
{
private:
    // implementation
    friend class FooInterface< FooImpl > ;
    void do_foo() { std::cout << "Foo\n"; }
};

class AnotherFooImpl
:
    public FooInterface< AnotherFooImpl > 
{
private:
    // implementation
    friend class FooInterface< AnotherFooImpl >;
    void do_foo() { std::cout << "AnotherFoo\n"; }
};

The alternative is to parametrize the different implementations of an interface. This time, the class template depends on both a template-template parameter and a non-type parameter

template<template<int> class F, int X>
class BarInterface
:
    public enable_down_cast< F<X> >
{
private:
    // dependent name now in scope
    using enable_down_cast< F<X> >::self;

public:
    // interface
    void bar() { self()->do_bar(); }    

protected:
    // disable deletion of Derived* through Base*
    // enable deletion of Base* through Derived*
    ~BarInterface() = default; // C++11 only, use ~BarInterface() {} in C++98/03
};

The implementation is then another class template, which derives from the interface with both itself and the non-type parameter as arguments

template< int X >
class BarImpl
:
    public BarInterface< BarImpl, X > 
{
private:
    // implementation
    friend class BarInterface< ::BarImpl, X >;
    void do_bar() { std::cout << X << "\n"; }    
};

This is how you call them:

int main()
{
    FooImpl f1;         
    AnotherFooImpl f2;
    BarImpl< 1 > b1;
    BarImpl< 2 > b2;

    f1.foo();
    f2.foo();
    b1.bar();
    b2.bar();

    return 0;
}

The classes in your question don't quite fit into this general pattern. If you might want to give Derived some CRTP-like behavior, then you can either do

class Derived1
: 
   public CRTP< Derived1 > 
{

};

template<int I>
class Derived2
: 
   public CRTPInt< Derived2, I >
{

};

UPDATE: Based on the discussion from http://stackoverflow.com/a/11571808/819272, I discovered that the original answer only compiled on Visual Studio 2010, but not on gcc because of some Microsoft-specific, non-portable features. E.g. the self() function from enable_down_cast is a (template) dependent name in its derived classes, and therefore not visible without explicit using directives. Furthermore, I have added defaulted destructors with the right level of protection. Finally, I have renamed my original class enable_crtp to enable_down_cast because that is precisely what it does: manually enable for static polymporphism what the compiler does automatically for dynamic polymorphism.

share|improve this answer
    
I was hoping to avoid the derived 2 solution. I'm putting together a modular camera object that allows policies to mix and match lenses, dollies, etc. I'd like to be able to specify a zoom lens as the focal min and focal max, i.e. Camera<Zoom<24,70>>, but the lens in return needs access to camera to call functions of other modules. (Actually in the lens case it does not, but in Dollies and Heads they do.) –  Tavison Jul 18 '12 at 19:21
    
@Tavison For policy-based designs you do not always need CRTP. E.g. you can directly derive from each policy: template<typename ZoomPolicy, typename DolliesPolicy> class Camera: public ZoomPolicy, pubic DolliesPlicy {}; Instead, you can then let each ConcreteZoomPolicy derive from a specific ZoomInterface etc. –  TemplateRex Jul 18 '12 at 19:42
    
@Tavison To continue, you could make template<typename Impl, int Min, int Max> class ZoomInterface: private enable_crpt< Impl<Min, Max> > {}; and then have implementations like template<int Min, int Max> class ZoomImpl: public ZoomInterface< ZoomImpl, Min, Max > {};. Then you could have a Camera< ZoomImpl<24, 70> > –  TemplateRex Jul 18 '12 at 19:49
    
I'll play around with this and accept your answer when I get it working. I knew I needed another layer in there, but was not finding it. –  Tavison Jul 18 '12 at 21:36
    
This doesn't compile in VC10. I get these errors. error C2923: 'F' : 'X' is not a valid template type argument for parameter '<unnamed-symbol>' see declaration of 'X' see reference to class template instantiation 'BarInterface<F,X>' being compiled error C3201: the template parameter list for class template 'BarImpl' does not match the template parameter list for template parameter 'F' see reference to class template instantiation 'BarImpl<X>' being compiled –  Tavison Jul 19 '12 at 23:38
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