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So, to start, I have seen posts like this: How to find which condition is true without using if statement

It's not quite what I need, although the idea is pertinent, in that I would like it to be more readable code.

I think Switch is the best bet, but let me explain.

I have this statement:

if (input == string.Empty || typeComboBox.Text == null)
{
    MessageBox.Show("Nothing to encrypt!", "Nothing Selected!");            
    return null;
}

So the idea here is that I used to have this statement broken into two "IF" statements, which isn't a huge deal, but for readability sake, and my on going effort of reducing code, I wanted to combine the statements into one.

If input is empty, I want the first argument in MessageBox.Show to appear, but not the second.

If typeComboBox.Text is null, I want the second option to appear, but not the first.

If they are both true statements, I want both to appear.

Now, my goal was to have these both done without the use of more than one test or method. Basically, I mean this: if I can find which condition is true and have the resultant data output within the same statement, that would be ideal.

I see switches being an option, and I don't understand them very well yet, but I think that would require me to make a decision method based on the outcome of this test, and send that outcome to the switch; which wouldn't be ideal, as I could simply have two if statements and less code.

Is there any way to do this in one statement? It's not necessary for this specific program, but I want to know for the future.

Thanks!

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5  
The most straightforward way to do this is to use two if statements. Do it like that. (If you want two messageboxes to show up, not one with the concatenated message.) I don't think a switch with fall-through can do what you want, assuming C# actually supports fall-through. –  millimoose Jul 18 '12 at 17:03
    
That's kind of where I thought this would end up going; I can always have it test with two IF statements, but if there was / is some wort of way to make it ONE test with variable outcome, I want to know! –  plast1K Jul 18 '12 at 17:09
    
@plast1K The if in your question is already performing two tests, not one. (Actually it's closer to four tests, if you look at the produced IL.) –  cdhowie Jul 18 '12 at 17:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I am assuming that you started with this code:

if (input == string.Empty)
{
    MessageBox.Show("Nothing to encrypt!");            
    return null;
}

if (typeComboBox.Text == null)
{
    MessageBox.Show("Nothing Selected!");            
    return null;
}

I don't consider there to be anything wrong with this code at all, and this is probably the most readable. It will perform exactly as many tests as necessary, and no more. Any alternative will result in more tests being performed, even though you may wind up with less code. For example:

if (input == string.Empty || typeComboBox.Text == null)
{
    MessageBox.Show((input == string.Empty) ? "Nothing to encrypt!" : "Nothing Selected!");
    return null;
}

Less lines of code, but in a failure scenario there will be two or three tests performed instead of one or two. It's also a bit less straightforward.

Terse code is nice, but make it too terse and it becomes harder to maintain. Readability lies somewhere between verbose and terse, and in this case the more verbose code is more readable, in my opinion.


Another option is to consider the fact that it would be appropriate to report multiple errors. For that, try code like this:

List<string> errors = new List<string>();

if (input == string.Empty)
{
    errors.Add("Nothing to encrypt.");
}

if (typeComboBox.Text == null)
{
    errors.Add("Nothing selected.");
}

if (errors.Count != 0)
{
    MessageBox.Show(string.Join(" ", errors.ToArray()));
    return null;
}

This is a bit more verbose than your original code, but it will allow all relevant errors to be reported instead of only the first one encountered.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not opposed to downvotes, but I would appreciate a comment from whoever did so that I know how to improve my answer. –  cdhowie Jul 18 '12 at 17:16
    
this is a fantastic answer, and it also gave me a wonderful representation of terse code at the same time, which I was also looking at, although I had some trouble understanding it as well. I appreciate the clarification. If I'm not mistaken, the terse code basically tests whether a condition is true, and if one is, continues the testing. Upon the former being true, it tests against a single argument, as there are only two, and if it is false, logically it uses the proper response assosciated witht he OTHER error, even though it isn't "seen"? –  plast1K Jul 18 '12 at 17:23
    
The terse code will test if either failure condition is met. If at least one is, then it will show a message based on which condition failed (it will perform one more test). The ?: operator is an inline conditional; the expression a ? b : c will test a and evaluate to b if a is true, or c if a is false. In other words, test-expression ? result-if-true : result-if-false. –  cdhowie Jul 18 '12 at 17:27
    
Niiiiiice :] Thanks, howie. –  plast1K Jul 18 '12 at 17:40

@millimoose's comment is right on; two if statements would be the cleanest thing for your code. However, if you're wanting to expand your validations to a large number or establish a general pattern for validations of this sort, you could do something like set up a validation table:

public class ValidationRule
{
    public ValidationRule(Func<bool> test, string errorMessage)
    {
        this.Test = test;
        this.ErrorMessage = errorMessage;
    }

    public Func<bool> Test { get; private set; }
    public string ErrorMessage { get; private set; }
}


var validationRules = new[] {
    new ValidationRule(() => input != string.Empty, "Nothing to encrypt!"),
    new ValidationRule(() => typeComboBox.Text != null, "Nothing Selected!")
};

With a table like this, you could then have code like this:

var errors = validationRules.Where(r => !r.Test()).Select(r => r.ErrorMessage);
if (errors.Any())
{
    MessageBox.Show(string.Join(' ', errors));            
    return null;
}

If, however, you're only looking for something for your two conditions, then this is over-engineering.

share|improve this answer

I'd suggest a slightly different pattern that might be more readable:

StringBuilder message = new StringBuilder();

if (input == string.Empty) message.Append("Nothing to encrypt!\n");
if (typeComboBox.Text == null) message.Append("Nothing selected!\n");
// ... repeat as many times as desired ...

if (message.Length > 0) {
    MessageBox.Show(message);
    return null;
} else {
    // proceed with your code here
}

This code has the advantage that it can show multiple messages, if more than one is valid. It can be frustrating for a user to see only one message at a time, if they have to go back, fix something, hit submit, and see a different error message.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd probably go with a List<string> instead, since that makes adding delimiting whitespace less of a hassle. There will be no space in between the two messages with this code. –  cdhowie Jul 18 '12 at 17:09
    
True, silly me, I hit submit too fast. Fixed it ;) –  Ted Spence Jul 18 '12 at 17:10
    
This is indeed a great answer, and you shed quite a bit of light on the program for me, as I didn't even think to consider multiple MessageBoxes! Thanks for the stringbuilder tip. –  plast1K Jul 18 '12 at 17:47

There isn't a way in code to have three (seemingly) different actions decided by a single logical statement. If you try to break it down to the simplest logical (not in code, but just mental logic) flow you still end up with something like:

If A is true then do B If C is true then do D If both A and C is true do B and D

That can be simplified by noting (as you did) that each condition is actually separate from the other:

If A is true then B is always done If C is true then D is always done

So, in your code, the simplest breakdown is

if (input == string.empty)
{
    // Do some stuff
}

if (typeComboBox.Text == null)
{
    // Do some other stuff
}

Now, rather than have a long complicated set of instructions on either method - you can simplify the look of your code by making this simply a decision section, that calls other methods to do the work:

if (input == string.empty)
{
    this.PrimeInputs(); // or something
}

if (typeComboBox.Text == null)
{
    this.InitTextBoxes(); // or something
}

The main thing is, this is different than a logical AND and logical OR since you want one action or the other - in some cases, and neither action if both cases are false, and both actions if both cases are true.

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I wouldn't say this is better than a couple "if" statements, but it is only one.

var message = 
    ((input==string.Empty ? 
        "Nothing to encrypt! " : 
        "") +
    (typeComboBox.Text == null ?
        "Nothing Selected!" :
        "")).Trim();


if (message != "") {
    MessageBox.Show(message);
    return null;
}

Generally speaking, though, I like using conditional operators to construct logic trees that result in a single outcome, it's much more terse than a bunch of nested if/else clauses. As long as you indent properly I find such structures highly readable and expressive. Unfortunately in this case it's not ideal because you have outcomes that depend on combinations of your operands. Using this kind of logic to build a string probably isn't the best idea, though it is still probably the most terse option.

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