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In C++, Given two anchor points and a handle point of a Quad Bezier curve, how can I calculate the other handle point in order to make the curve length to a fixed value?

What kind of orbit will it be?

I am doing a CAD software. I need to make the cursor "snap to" the possible point when moving nearby it. So I need to calculate the orbit rather than simply check what the length would be.

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I don't see anything that is specific to C++, or even programming, in this question. You're asking a math question. –  abelenky Jul 18 '12 at 17:17
    
@abelenky Programming related though. I wouldn’t necessarily consider that off-topic. On the other hand, the question is a bit vague – then again, I don’t enough about the matter at hand to comment about that. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 18 '12 at 17:20
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Computing the length of a Bezier curve is kind of programming related, as no convenient closed form for the arc length of an algebraic curve exists. The sought after locus of the handle point should be amenable to some differential equation that you'd wish to solve numerically. However, the question should be closed under this form. Come back when you have some code to write, in the meantime you can ask math.stackexchange for help. –  Alexandre C. Jul 18 '12 at 17:21
    
I added some explanation. Yes it is a math question but I need to solve it in C++. It needs optimization for programming since computer cannot easily solve complicated calculations. Or maybe there could be some analogic solution in C++. –  h5nc Jul 18 '12 at 17:22
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@Alexandre C wow I never knew about math.stackexchange. Thanks and I will post there instead. –  h5nc Jul 18 '12 at 17:25
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1 Answer 1

Length of a quadratic Bezier curve P1P2P3 is bounded by length of polyline P1P2P3, i. e.,

||P3 - P2|| + ||P2 - P1|| = const

as P1 and P3 are fixed, thus, P2 lies on an ellipse with P1 and P3 being its focal points.

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