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I made very simple port scanner, but it runs too slow, so I'm looking for way to make it scan faster. Here is my code:

public boolean portIsOpen(String ip, int port, int timeout) {
        try {
            Socket socket = new Socket();
            socket.connect(new InetSocketAddress(ip, port), timeout);
            socket.close();
            return true;
        } catch (Exception ex) {
            return false;
        }
    }

this code here test if specific port is open on specific ip. For timeout I use minimum value of 200 because when I go lower it doesnt have enough time to test the port. Well It works well, but takes too much to scan from 0 to 65535. Is there any other way that could maybe scan from 0 to 65535 in less than 5 minutes?

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Have you tried with threads? –  Elias Jul 18 '12 at 17:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 33 down vote accepted

If you need 200ms for each of the 65536 ports (in the worst case, a firewall is blocking everything, thus making you hit your timeout for every single port), the maths is pretty simple: you need 13k seconds, or about 3 hours and a half.

You have 2 (non-exclusive) options to make it faster:

  • reduce your timeout
  • paralellize your code

Since the operation is I/O bound (in contrast to CPU bound -- that is, you spend time waiting for I/O, and not for some huge calculation to complete), you can use many, many threads. Try starting with 20. They would divide the 3 hours and a half among them, so the maximum expected time is about 10 minutes. Just remember that this will put pressure on the other side, ie, the scanned host will see huge network activity with "unreasonable" or "strange" patterns, making the scan extremely easy to detect.

The easiest way (ie, with minimal changes) is to use the ExecutorService and Future APIs:

public static Future<Boolean> portIsOpen(final ExecutorService es, final String ip, final int port, final int timeout) {
  return es.submit(new Callable<Boolean>() {
      @Override public Boolean call() {
        try {
          Socket socket = new Socket();
          socket.connect(new InetSocketAddress(ip, port), timeout);
          socket.close();
          return true;
        } catch (Exception ex) {
          return false;
        }
      }
   });
}

Then, you can do something like:

public static void main(final String... args) {
  final ExecutorService es = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(20);
  final String ip = "127.0.0.1";
  final int timeout = 200;
  final List<Future<Boolean>> futures = new ArrayList<>();
  for (int port = 1; port <= 65535; port++) {
    futures.add(portIsOpen(es, ip, port, timeout));
  }
  es.shutdown();
  int openPorts = 0;
  for (final Future<Boolean> f : futures) {
    if (f.get()) {
      openPorts++;
    }
  }
  System.out.println("There are " + openPorts + " open ports on host " + ip + " (probed with a timeout of " + timeout + "ms)");
}

If you need to know which ports are open (and not just how many, as in the above example), you'd need to change the return type of the function to Future<SomethingElse>, where SomethingElse would hold the port and the result of the scan, something like:

public final class ScanResult {
  private final int port;
  private final boolean isOpen;
  // constructor
  // getters
}

Then, change Boolean to ScanResult in the first snippet, and return new ScanResult(port, true) or new ScanResult(port, false) instead of just true or false

EDIT: Actually, I just noticed: in this particular case, you don't need the ScanResult class to hold result + port, and still know which port is open. Since you add the futures to a List, which is ordered, and, later on, you process them in the same order you added them, you could have a counter that you'd increment on each iteration to know which port you are dealing with. But, hey, this is just to be complete and precise. Don't ever try doing that, it is horrible, I'm mostly ashamed that I thought about this... Using the ScanResult object is much cleaner, the code is way easier to read and maintain, and allows you to, later, for example, use a CompletionService to improve the scanner.

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I haven't used it but wouldn't a SocketFactory (docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/javax/net/SocketFactory.html) help too ? –  WinOrWin Jul 18 '12 at 18:23
    
I can't really see how using a SocketFactory relates to this problem. Would you care to explain what you have in mind? –  Bruno Reis Jul 18 '12 at 18:25
    
I thought SocketFactory can be implemented to have something like a SocketPool in the backing, which can result in speed-up. Not sure if this works.. it is not a suggestion, just a query on your approach. –  WinOrWin Jul 18 '12 at 18:45
2  
A "SocketPool", in this context, makes no sense at all. A TCP socket is the quadruple (src-ip, src-port, dest-ip, dest-port) which is immutable (ie, you cannot change ips or ports in the middle of a connection); since each port you test is a different dest-port, you see that you need a different TCP Socket for each port you test, therefore, no pooling can help. –  Bruno Reis Jul 18 '12 at 19:03
    
Thanks, this is often a confusion for me as a newbie. –  WinOrWin Jul 18 '12 at 20:26

Apart from parallelizing the scan, you can use more advanced port scanning techniques like the ones (TCP SYN and TCP FIN scanning) explained here: http://nmap.org/nmap_doc.html. VB code of an implementation can be found here: http://h.ackack.net/spoon-worlds-fastest-port-scanner.html

In order to use these techniques, however, you need to use raw TCP/IP sockets. You should use RockSaw library for this.

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If you decide to use the Nmap option and want to continue with Java, you should look at Nmap4j on SourceForge.net (http://nmap4j.sourceforge.net). It's a simple API that allows you to integrate Nmap into a java app.

--Jon

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