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This is a simple .NET 4 application. Here's the code I want to run:

string username = "userfoo";
string password = "passwordfoo";

for (int i = 0; i < 2000; i++)
{    
    uint matchId;
    if (!uint.TryParse(i.ToString(), out matchId))
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Invalid Match ID!");
        return;
    }

    Client client = new Client (username, password, matchId);

    // connect
    client.Connect();

    client.Wait();

    if (client.Match != null)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Inserting match: #{0}", client.Match.match_id);
        Helpers.MatchHelper.AddMatchToDatabase(client.Match);
    }
    else
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Couldn't get match: #{0}", 1);
    }

}

Instead doing this one by one (it would take forever - 415 days nonstop according to my calculations), what's the easiest way to invoke each iteration of this for loop asynchronously?

Most questions and articles are very old (circa 2001!) surely there must be a more modern approach?

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc301332.aspx

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have you considered using Tasks? –  Tamir Dresher Jul 18 '12 at 17:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can find information here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff963552.aspx. Basically, you just use Parallel.For(0, n, x => doSomething). That takes care of parallelization. This is a functionality of PLINQ that is extremely easy to use an in my experience works quite well.

Your sample would look like this:

string username = "userfoo";
string password = "passwordfoo";

Parallel.For(0, 2000, i =>
{    
    uint matchId;
    if (!uint.TryParse(i.ToString(), out matchId))
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Invalid Match ID!");
        return;
    }

    Client client = new Client (username, password, matchId);

    // connect
    client.Connect();

    client.Wait();

    if (client.Match != null)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Inserting match: #{0}", client.Match.match_id);
        Helpers.MatchHelper.AddMatchToDatabase(client.Match);
    }
    else
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Couldn't get match: #{0}", 1);
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah I ended up with something similar in my initial test. I'm curious: since this uses the internet to fetch data, opening up 2000 connections at once to download information makes nothing download at all. Is there a way to limit the amount of tasks being launched at a time? Like say, 40 executions at any given time? –  Only Bolivian Here Jul 18 '12 at 17:59
    
To my understanding that is not how it works. It opens an "appropriate" amount of threads based on the capability of your machine. But I am not aware of any way that would let you explicitly define the parallelism level. –  Jan Kratochvil Jul 18 '12 at 18:02
    
Any suggestions on how to approach this? –  Only Bolivian Here Jul 18 '12 at 18:06
    
You could look into the Reactive Extensions library. Basically it acts as an asynchronous collection and it is really powerful. But it requires some investment to understand it properly (I'm still in the 'struggling phase' :D) –  Jan Kratochvil Jul 18 '12 at 18:09
    
You can limit the amount of tasks using the ParalelOptions object. I'll write an answer. Thanks again! –  Only Bolivian Here Jul 18 '12 at 18:26

You should look at the task parallel library

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If i understand you correctly, you want to run these in a separate thread. Here's one way to do this: You need to move the code from the loop into a void function:

void MyThreadInsteadOfLoop(object parameter)
{
int i  = (int)parameter;
uint matchId;
if (!uint.TryParse(i.ToString(), out matchId))
{
    Console.WriteLine("Invalid Match ID!");
    return;
}

Client client = new Client (username, password, matchId);

// connect
client.Connect();

client.Wait();

if (client.Match != null)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Inserting match: #{0}", client.Match.match_id);
    Helpers.MatchHelper.AddMatchToDatabase(client.Match);
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine("Couldn't get match: #{0}", 1);
}
}

In your main thread, you need to prepare threads to run, start them, and wait them to finish, if you want to. Here's the code:

//Create threads
List<Thread> threads = new List<Thread>();
for(int i=0;i<2000;i++)
{
    threads.Add(new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(MyThreadInsteadOfLoop)));
}
//Start threads
int x = 0;
foreach(var t in threads)
{
    t.Start(x);
    x++;
}
//wait for the threads to finish
foreach(var t in threads)
{
    t.Join();
}

Be aware, that you have to make the MatchHelper class, and other classes that exchange data with your threads thread safe, and that tends to add lots of overhead to your program. Also, you can possibly run into trouble with the network connections. Only [NumberOfCpuCores]*2 threads will actively work (*2 because of hyper-threading) at a time, but since you have to wait for the client (I really hope that's not a while(true) cycle cloaked) that might get concealed at least partly.

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