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I see in some of the code on Github

if($something_funky_happens){
  throw new \LogicException(...);
  return;
}

Is this required, or it is not important to return? because I know that after you throw exceptions the script stops, so further code does not run

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1  
statement is not reachable, perhaps introduced later? –  mdo Jul 18 '12 at 18:09
    
no, the return is in the same IF statement. see here for an example: github.com/fabpot/Sami/blob/master/Sami/Parser/… –  Alex Jul 18 '12 at 18:11
    
Why do some people return after throwing anything? Shouldn't they know better? Great question, though. –  Smandoli Jul 21 '12 at 1:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

unreachable code

I tend to denote it an error in their code. The statement is not reachable. Every static code anaylsis tool will complain about this unreachable statement. Even when it has no harm in this case you will get a load of warnings when checking your code. If you turn these warning type off you will perhaps miss other logic errors within your code. It's a real bad smell and it needs to be fixed.

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I guess it is just for better readability....so you can scan the code faster for exit points, if you pretend that every exit point is seperated by a new line.

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How does it improve readabiltiy if you stop reading the code and wonder why there is an additional return? –  mdo Jul 18 '12 at 18:29
    
The author might pretend that everybody is following this weird convention. I don't know what it is for, but I don't think it is an error, since it is in the code of the symfony creator and since so many people are following his repos on github someone would have reported it. –  Abenil Jul 18 '12 at 19:25
    
Ok, you now got me to download the current Symfony ... out of curiosity. Last time I looked at it the code didn't look like it was created by clean code fetishists. You deny that it could be an "error" because the code was found in the project of the Symfony grandmaster? Your argument seems invalid. I don't know him, don't want to say that he is no smart guy. But Symfony is full of smells. PHPDOCs not matching method signatures, some unused local variables, some unused method parameters ... just saying. –  mdo Jul 18 '12 at 19:52
    
I don't like Symfony either...but I'm sure they have a reason for that in their point of view. –  Abenil Jul 18 '12 at 20:11

Because they made a mistake, or it's their personal preference. It's impossible to get to the return in that code, but there's no real harm in including it.

From the docs (emphasis mine):

When an exception is thrown, code following the statement will not be executed, and PHP will attempt to find the first matching catch block.

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No "harm", but if you use an intelligent IDE it will probably complain about unreachable code. I would advice not to write code like this. Jetbrains for example flags this with the hint "unreachable statement". –  mdo Jul 18 '12 at 18:27

He probably wanted to be super careful. So in case of some kind of mistake in the way that PHP handles exceptions he wanted be sure that the execution stops so he added return.

That probably will never be needed, but some guys like to cover all the possible cases.

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This is rather the impossible case –  mdo Jul 18 '12 at 19:32
    
@mdo Yes but I can't think of any other reason why a smart guy like Fabien would write this. –  Bojan Dević Jul 18 '12 at 19:48

I find this convention useful, as when trying to read existing code, an early exit can break expectations of the code flow. and often deserves to be signposted. It's almost a goto.

I read from outermost blocks to innermost, not sequentially, so anything buried inside a block looks less important at first glance.

Comparing:

function doStuff {
  if (Y) {
    ##
    ## Stuff happens
    ##
  }
  else {
    ##
    ## Other Stuff happens
    ##
  }
  ##
  ## So I assume this always happens
  ##
}

with

function doStuff {
  if (Y) {
    ##
    ## Stuff happens
    ##
  }
  else {
    ##
    ## Other Stuff happens
    return; 
    # ^- this is easy to spot when scanning
    ##
  }
  ##
  ## This *usually* happens
  ##
}

I prefer the latter, even if it can be a little redundant.

I do accept that that's mostly because I'm 100x more conditioned to seeing 'return' as an important keyword, vs the number of times I have to expect exceptions, but I can spot a stand-alone 'return;' (or 'break;', or even 'continue;') much faster in screenfuls of code than I can pick out "throw new Exception(xxx,yyy);" at a distance when scrolling fast.

If I worked on code where exception-handling was a much more frequent method of process-flow-management, I may become more sensitized to spotting 'throw' as a keyword, but I'm not.

But then, I'm also guilty of redundant signposting like:

function doStuff() {
  if (X) {
    ## Do this
  }
  else {
    ## Do that
  }
  /* Should not get here. */
  return NULL;
}

... but only in extreme cases where the above logic is hard to follow, such as when there were early exits expected.

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