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I know how to disable one hyperlink at a time, so when user clicks on it then nothing will happen. Here is sample:

$('#myLink').click(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    //do other stuff when a click happens
});

But now I have many hyperlink for my pager within li and div. It looks like:

<div id='pager'>
    <ul>
        <li>
            <a href='search.aspx?page=1'>1</a>
        </li>
        <li>
            <a href='search.aspx?page=2'>2</a>
        </li>
        <li>
            <a href='search.aspx?page=3'>3</a>
        </li>
        <li>
            <a href='search.aspx?page=4'>4</a>
        </li>
    </ul>
</div>    

I want to iterate in all hyperlink with in my div and enable/disable all through two routines. As a result when the user clicks then nothing will happen and no postback occurs. One routine will disable all and one routine will enable all hyperlink as before. How can this be achieved?

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it may work...// Better to use the live event handler here, performancewise $('a').live('click', function() {... return false;}); // Now simply kill the binding like this $('a').die('click'); –  Thomas Jul 18 '12 at 18:41
    
No offense Thomas, but that's terrible advice :-) live is widely reviled because of the unintended consequences of using it. If you do want to account for new A tags that might get added to the page later, delegate is the better approach. (See stackoverflow.com/questions/4579117/jquery-live-vs-delegate for more info) –  machineghost Jul 18 '12 at 18:42
    
@machineghost Unless you're going to delegate to the document -- which is the same thing as live performance-wise. –  Blazemonger Jul 18 '12 at 18:47
    
@Blazemonger True, but even then I think delegate is preferable because it is more explicit. With live the user seems to magically get an event handler that always works, and if they don't delve in to the inner workings of live they won't understand what's going on. With delegate they are specifically saying "I'm hooking up an event handler to the document", and if nothing else they're more aware of what they're doing (although ideally of course that awareness will lead to them delegating higher up in the DOM). So, I still maintain that it's a best practice to never use live. –  machineghost Jul 18 '12 at 19:10
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
$('#pager a').click(function(e) {
e.preventDefault();
//do other stuff when a click happens
});
share|improve this answer
    
i think it is also good solution. $('a').addClass('disabled'); $('a').click(function() { if($(this).hasClass('disabled') return false; }); –  Thomas Jul 18 '12 at 18:44
    
If you want some A tags to be disabled and some not, that might make sense, but otherwise you're just over-complicating things. And even if you do want to "enable" some A tags and not others, a simpler way of doing it would just be to unbind the click handler, rather than adding a class and then making the click handler perform logic to interpret that class. –  machineghost Jul 18 '12 at 19:14
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Just use a jQuery selector that grabs all of those A tags, like so:

$('#pager a').click(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
}
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1  
Selectors are your friend! –  Giovanni B Jul 18 '12 at 18:47
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