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Can I setup JPA/hibernate to persist Boolean types as Y/N? In the database (the column is defined as varchar2(1). It currently stores them as 0/1. The database is Oracle.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The only way I've figured out how to do this is to have two properties for my class. One as the boolean for the programming API which is not included in the mapping. It's getter and setter reference a private char variable which is Y/N. I then have another protected property which is included in the hibernate mapping and it's getters and setters reference the private char variable directly.

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1  
I had to do something similar - I changed the type of the member from Boolean to String. In the getters and setters (which got and set Boolean) I wrote code to convert Y/N to the corresponding Boolean value. –  askullhead Jul 21 '09 at 23:00

Hibernate has a built-in "yes_no" type that would do what you want. It maps to a CHAR(1) column in the database.

Basic mapping: <property name="some_flag" type="yes_no"/>

Annotation mapping (Hibernate extensions):

@Type(type="yes_no")
public boolean getFlag();
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10  
For those who are interested, there is also a "true_false" type that will store either "T" or "F". –  Matt Solnit Jul 20 '09 at 20:00
    
This worked, but I could not use it because it's a hibernate specific annotation. Thanks for the answer. Might use it in a different project. –  askullhead Jul 21 '09 at 23:04
    
this is for hibernate 4 and later, that means for java 1.6 and later. doesent work for hibernate 3.* –  storm_buster Apr 9 '12 at 14:37
4  
@storm_buster Hibernate 4 did not exist when this answer was given. It works perfectly fine with Hibernate 3.x and java 1.5 –  ChssPly76 Apr 9 '12 at 17:23

This is pure JPA without using getters/setters. As of 2013/2014 it is the best answer without using any Hibernate specific annotations, but please note this solution is JPA 2.1, and was not available when the question was first asked:

@Entity
public class Person {    

    @Convert(converter=BooleanToStringConverter.class)
    private Boolean isAlive;    
    ...
}

And then:

@Converter
public class BooleanToStringConverter implements AttributeConverter<Boolean, String> {

    @Override
    public String convertToDatabaseColumn(Boolean value) {        
        return (value != null && value) ? "Y" : "N";            
        }    

    @Override
    public Boolean convertToEntityAttribute(String value) {
        return "Y".equals(value);
        }
    }
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The converter shows the idea, but is of course not working. The converter uses the possible values of Y, N and T. I am also not sure one should omit the case of having a null value as a result of a conversion. –  Matthias May 14 at 8:27
    
@Matthias Yes, T was a typo. I fixed it. Thanks. –  marcg Jun 4 at 14:55

I used the concept from the answer posted by @marcg and it works great with JPA 2.1. His code wasn't quite right, so I'm posted my working implementation. This will convert Boolean entity fields to a Y/N character column in the database.

From my entity class:

@Convert(converter=BooleanToYNStringConverter.class)
@Column(name="LOADED", length=1)
private Boolean isLoadedSuccessfully;

My converter class:

/**
 * Converts a Boolean entity attribute to a single-character
 * Y/N string that will be stored in the database, and vice-versa
 * 
 * @author jtough
 */
public class BooleanToYNStringConverter 
        implements AttributeConverter<Boolean, String> {

    /**
     * This implementation will return "Y" if the parameter is Boolean.TRUE,
     * otherwise it will return "N" when the parameter is Boolean.FALSE. 
     * A null input value will yield a null return value.
     * @param b Boolean
     */
    @Override
    public String convertToDatabaseColumn(Boolean b) {
        if (b == null) {
            return null;
        }
        if (b.booleanValue()) {
            return "Y";
        }
        return "N";
    }

    /**
     * This implementation will return Boolean.TRUE if the string
     * is "Y" or "y", otherwise it will ignore the value and return
     * Boolean.FALSE (it does not actually look for "N") for any
     * other non-null string. A null input value will yield a null
     * return value.
     * @param s String
     */
    @Override
    public Boolean convertToEntityAttribute(String s) {
        if (s == null) {
            return null;
        }
        if (s.equals("Y") || s.equals("y")) {
            return Boolean.TRUE;
        }
        return Boolean.FALSE;
    }

}

This variant is also fun if you love emoticons and are just sick and tired of Y/N or T/F in your database. In this case, your database column must be two characters instead of one. Probably not a big deal.

/**
 * Converts a Boolean entity attribute to a happy face or sad face
 * that will be stored in the database, and vice-versa
 * 
 * @author jtough
 */
public class BooleanToHappySadConverter 
        implements AttributeConverter<Boolean, String> {

    public static final String HAPPY = ":)";
    public static final String SAD = ":(";

    /**
     * This implementation will return ":)" if the parameter is Boolean.TRUE,
     * otherwise it will return ":(" when the parameter is Boolean.FALSE. 
     * A null input value will yield a null return value.
     * @param b Boolean
     * @return String or null
     */
    @Override
    public String convertToDatabaseColumn(Boolean b) {
        if (b == null) {
            return null;
        }
        if (b.booleanValue()) {
            return HAPPY;
        }
        return SAD;
    }

    /**
     * This implementation will return Boolean.TRUE if the string
     * is ":)", otherwise it will ignore the value and return
     * Boolean.FALSE (it does not actually look for ":(") for any
     * other non-null string. A null input value will yield a null
     * return value.
     * @param s String
     * @return Boolean or null
     */
    @Override
    public Boolean convertToEntityAttribute(String s) {
        if (s == null) {
            return null;
        }
        if (HAPPY.equals(s)) {
            return Boolean.TRUE;
        }
        return Boolean.FALSE;
    }

}
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To even do better boolean mapping to Y/N, add to your hibernate configuration:

<!-- when using type="yes_no" for booleans, the line below allow booleans in HQL expressions: -->
<property name="hibernate.query.substitutions">true 'Y', false 'N'</property>

Now you can use booleans in HQL, for example:

"FROM " + SomeDomainClass.class.getName() + " somedomainclass " +
"WHERE somedomainclass.someboolean = false"
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using JPA 2.1 converters is the best solution, however if you are using earlier version of JPA I can recommend one more solution (or workaround). Create an enum called BooleanWrapper with 2 values of T and F and add following method to it to get wrapped value: public Boolean getValue() { return this == T; }, map it with @Enumerated(EnumType.STRING).

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To do it in a generic JPA way using getter annotations, the example below works for me with Hibernate 3.5.4 and Oracle 11g. Note that the mapped getter and setter (getOpenedYnString and setOpenedYnString) are private methods. Those methods provide the mapping but all programmatic access to the class is using the getOpenedYn and setOpenedYn methods.

private String openedYn;

@Transient
public Boolean getOpenedYn() {
  return toBoolean(openedYn);
}

public void setOpenedYn(Boolean openedYn) {
  setOpenedYnString(toYesNo(openedYn));
}

@Column(name = "OPENED_YN", length = 1)
private String getOpenedYnString() {
  return openedYn;
}

private void setOpenedYnString(String openedYn) {
  this.openedYn = openedYn;
}

Here's the util class with static methods toYesNo and toBoolean:

public class JpaUtil {

    private static final String NO = "N";
    private static final String YES = "Y";

    public static String toYesNo(Boolean value) {
        if (value == null)
            return null;
        else if (value)
            return YES;
        else
            return NO;
    }

    public static Boolean toBoolean(String yesNo) {
        if (yesNo == null)
            return null;
        else if (YES.equals(yesNo))
            return true;
        else if (NO.equals(yesNo))
            return false;
        else
            throw new RuntimeException("unexpected yes/no value:" + yesNo);
    }
}
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why the down vote? –  davem Apr 3 at 3:57

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