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I've got the following grid of numbers centered around 0 and increasing in spiral. I need an algorithm which would receive number in spiral and return x; y - numbers of moves how to get to that number from 0. For example for number 9 it would return -2; -1. For 4 it would be 1; 1.

25|26|... etc.
24| 9|10|11|12
23| 8| 1| 2|13
22| 7| 0| 3|14
21| 6| 5| 4|15
20|19|18|17|16

This spiral can be slightly changed if it would help the algorithm to be better. Use whatever language you like. I would really appreciate mathematical explanation.

Thank you.

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Hmm, I don't know how. Just more examples: 1 => [x: -1;y: 0], 2 => [x: -1; y: 1], 17 => [x: 2; y: 1]. In words: "When the input is 17 you need to do two steps down (on the x axis) and one to the right (on the y axis)". I want to know how to get these distances. (I have swapped x and y by mistake, I used x as vertical axis and y as horizontal). Why do I need this? I know number of items centered around some point ("0") and need to distribute them equally around in squares. –  Andrew123321 Jul 18 '12 at 21:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

First we need to determine which cycle (distance from center) and sector (north, east, south or west) we are in. Then we can determine the exact position of the number.

  • The first numbers in each cycle is as follows: 1, 9, 25

  • This is a quadratic sequence: first(n) = (2n-1)^2 = 4n^2 - 4n + 1

  • The inverse of this is the cycle-number: cycle(i) = floor((sqrt(i) + 1) / 2)

  • The length of a cycle is: length(n) = first(n+1) - first(n) = 8n

  • The sector will then be:
    sector(i) = floor(4 * (i - first(cycle(i))) / length(cycle(i)))

  • Finally, to get the position, we need to extrapolate from the position of the first number in the cycle and sector.

To put it all together:

def first(cycle):
    x = 2 * cycle - 1
    return x * x

def cycle(index):
    return (isqrt(index) + 1)//2

def length(cycle):
    return 8 * cycle

def sector(index):
    c = cycle(index)
    offset = index - first(c)
    n = length(c)
    return 4 * offset / n

def position(index):
    c = cycle(index)
    s = sector(index)
    offset = index - first(c) - s * length(c) // 4
    if s == 0: #north
        return -c, -c + offset + 1
    if s == 1: #east
        return -c + offset + 1, c
    if s == 2: #south
        return c, c - offset - 1
    # else, west
    return c - offset - 1, -c

def isqrt(x):
    """Calculates the integer square root of a number"""
    if x < 0:
        raise ValueError('square root not defined for negative numbers')
    n = int(x)
    if n == 0:
        return 0
    a, b = divmod(n.bit_length(), 2)
    x = 2**(a+b)
    while True:
        y = (x + n//x)//2
        if y >= x:
            return x
        x = y

Example:

>>> position(9)
(-2, -1)
>>> position(4)
(1, 1)
>>> position(123456)
(-176, 80)
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Seems interesting. I had a hard time rewriting this to PHP (and proving and accepting) - it doesn't work for me. Can someone have a look at this transcription please pastebin.com/40Ry9dPJ ? Thank you –  Andrew123321 Jul 18 '12 at 23:23
    
I managed to run this in Python 3. Results are (-2, -1), (0, -1), (175, -176) for same inputs as yours. Quite strange. –  Andrew123321 Jul 18 '12 at 23:27
1  
@Andrew123321, See ideone.com/TJKb7 –  Markus Jarderot Jul 18 '12 at 23:49

Do you mean something like this? I did not implement any algorithm and the code can be written better but it works - that's always a start :) Just change the threshold value for whatever you wish and you'll get the result.

static int threshold=14, x=0, y=0;

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        int yChange=1, xChange=1, count=0;
        while( !end(count) ){

            for (int i = 0; i < yChange; i++) {
                if( end(count) )return;
                count++;
                y--;
            }
            yChange++;
            for (int i = 0; i < xChange; i++) {
                if( end(count) )return;
                count++;
                x++;
            }
            xChange++;
            for (int i = 0; i < yChange; i++) {
                if( end(count) )return;
                count++;
                y++;
            }
            yChange++;
            for (int i = 0; i < xChange; i++) {
                if( end(count) )return;
                count++;
                x--;
            }
            xChange++;

        }

    }

    public static boolean end(int count){
        if(count<threshold){
            return false;
        }else{
            System.out.println("count: "+count+", x: "+x+", y: "+y);
            return true;
        }
    }
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