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Example

#include <vector>
#include <cassert>

template <typename Cont, typename... Rest>
void f(Cont& c, Rest&... rest)
{
    assert(c.size() == ???);
}


int main()
{
    std::vector<int> v1(10);
    std::vector<int> v2(10);
    std::vector<int> v3(10);
    std::vector<int> v4(10);

    f(v1, v2, v3, v4);
}

I want to make sure that all the containers passed to a function are the same size. However, the function is a variadic template that takes an arbitrary number of containers of the same type. Is this possible?

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1  
Hint: How would you write an f taking three arguments? –  aschepler Jul 18 '12 at 21:42
    
@aschepler: Thanks for the hint, that helped a lot. –  Jesse Good Jul 18 '12 at 21:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted
#include <vector>
#include <cassert>

template <typename Size>
bool check_size(Size) {
  return true;
}

template <typename Size, typename Cont, typename... Rest>
bool check_size(Size expected, Cont& c, Rest&... rest) {
  return (c.size() == expected && check_size(expected, rest...));
}

template <typename Cont, typename... Rest>
void f(Cont& c, Rest&... rest)
{
  assert(check_size(c.size(), rest...));
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> v1(10);
    std::vector<int> v2(10);
    std::vector<int> v3(10);
    std::vector<int> v4(10);

    f(v1, v2, v3, v4);
}
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The standard paradigm is a "first, rest" template. So you'd declare a validate template function which takes a first argument (a container with a size() member) and a "rest" argument (the variadic part) and returns either the number of elements in a valid rest list or a number outside that set (e.g. -1) on error. A separate validate() template would take only one argument and be selected for in the event rest has a single element; it would just return the size of the element.

But... yikes. What's the goal here?

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The function will create a container of iterators that contains iterators to all of the containers passed in. –  Jesse Good Jul 18 '12 at 21:51
    
I guess that seems sane. The user experience is clean anyway. MvG and Vlad above both seem to have correct-looking solutions along this line. I was too lazy to code. –  Andy Ross Jul 18 '12 at 21:57
    
Ah, laziness: The programmer's greatest obstacle. –  chris Jul 18 '12 at 22:08
1  
@chris: and the programmer's greatest motivation… after all, I write most of my programs because I'm too lazy to do things by hand. –  MvG Jul 19 '12 at 9:07

You can use the "usual" pattern, but have two named arguments:

template <typename ...Args> bool AllTheSame(Args &&...) { return true; }

template <typename A, typename B, typename ...Rest>
bool AllTheSame(A && a, B && b, Rest &&... rest)
{
    return a.size() == b.size() &&
           AllTheSame(std::forward<B>(b), std::forward<Rest>(rest)...);
}
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Only works if you have an equal number of containers, otherwise will screw the result if the last one is not the same size. –  Xeo Jul 18 '12 at 22:13
    
@Xeo: How so? Can you give a (counter)-example? –  Kerrek SB Jul 19 '12 at 7:18
    
Any particular reason why you use rvalue references here? Makes code harder to read, makes callers fear whether they might loose their data, and I see no gain whatsoever. –  MvG Jul 20 '12 at 17:33
    
@MvG: They're not rvalue references. They're universal references. Note that we're in a template. –  Kerrek SB Jul 20 '12 at 20:26
    
Universal as in rvalue if the user passed in rvalue, lvalue if he passed lvalue, yes, but still, why bother with all those std::forward calls here? –  MvG Jul 20 '12 at 20:30

Something like this should do (I didn't check, have no compiler at hand)

template <typename Cont, typename... Rest>
void assertAllOfSize(int size, Cont& first, Rest&... rest)
{
    assert(first.size() == size);
    assertAllOfSize(size, rest...);
}

template <typename Cont, typename... Rest>
void assertAllEqualSize(Cont& first, Rest&... rest)
{
    assertAllOfSize(first.size(), rest...);
}

template <typename Cont> // terminate recursion
void assertAllOfSize(int size, Cont& first)
{
    assert(first.size() == size);
}
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