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I want to write a rule that looks something like this:

foo.out: (out of date if foo.in is newer than foo.out.stamp)
    # update foo.out if and only if the new foo.out has different contents
    # than the old foo.out (a change to foo.in may or may not change foo.out)
    && touch foo.out.stamp

I can't do this:

foo.out.stamp: foo.in
    # update foo.out if and only if the new foo.out has different contents
    # than the old foo.out (a change to foo.in may or may not change foo.out)
    && touch foo.out.stamp

foo.out: foo.out.stamp

Because if foo.in changes, but the recipe for foo.out.stamp does not change foo.out, make will always view foo.out as out of date.

Is there any way to write this kind of rule?

Edit: Explanation of why I don't unconditionally touch foo.out:

I am working with Vala. The Vala compilation process looks something like this:

  1. For each .vala file, generate a .vapi file (similar to a header file).
  2. For each .vala file, generate a .c file (this requires the individual .vala file and every .vapi file to be given to the compiler)
  3. Continue the typical .c -> .o -> executable/library process.

For steps #1 and #2, the Vala compiler only updates the .vapi/.c file if its contents have been changed. This is to prevent needless .c -> .o recompilation.

In makefile terms:

  • A .vapi file is out of date if the .vala file has changed since the last time the Vala compiler regenerated the .vapi file (not the last time that the .vapi file was modified).
  • A .c file is out of date if the .vala or any .vapi file has changed since the last time the Vala compiler regenerated the .c file (not the last time that the .c file was modified).
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In your second example: Why don't you touch foo.out unconditionally (or, at least, if no error has occurred)? –  krlmlr Jul 18 '12 at 22:05
    
@user946850: See my edit. –  Matthew Jul 18 '12 at 22:15
1  
Actually, I am facing similar issues in one of my projects. Currently I just live with it but I'd definitely like to see a solution for this. –  krlmlr Jul 18 '12 at 22:18

4 Answers 4

There was a technique roughly equivalent to what you want used in Kernighan & Pike 'The UNIX Programming Environment' (1984), used with Yacc grammars.

The Yacc source file might be grammar.y. The default output files from Yacc were y.tab.c and y.tab.h. Other files (notably the lexical analyzer) depend on the header, but the header doesn't often change even though the C code for the grammar (the actions) does. So, it was sensible to ensure that the header used by the lexical analyzer was changed only if the header generated by Yacc was different. The way of dealing with that was to have the lexical analyzer include x.tab.h (not y.tab.h), and to copy a new y.tab.h over the old x.tab.h only if there was a difference.

x.tab.h: y.tab.h
   -cmp -s x.tab.h y.tab.h || cp y.tab.h x.tab.h

This is harder to apply in your context because you don't seem to have control over the file names that you can use in the same way — the filename.vala file produces filename.vapi and filename.c, and other Vala source files needing the services of code in filename.vala will automatically include filename.vapi.


You say:

In makefile terms:

  • A .vapi file is out of date if the .vala file has changed since the last time the Vala compiler regenerated the .vapi file (not the last time that the .vapi file was modified).
  • A .c file is out of date if the .vala or any .vapi file has changed since the last time the Vala compiler regenerated the .c file (not the last time that the .c file was modified).

The first rule is simply the normal source/object relationship:

%.vapi: %.vala
    $(VALAC) -h $*.vala

Where (I'm guessing) the -h option generates the header (.vapi) file from the Vala source, and the corresponding -c option generates the C source (.c) file.

The second rule is also a normal source/object relationship:

%.c: %.vala
    $(VALAC) -c $*.vala

This says that the .c file is regenerated from the .vala file if the .vala file is more recent than the .c file. Additionally, the .c file depends on the .vapi files it includes:

file1.c:  file2.vapi file3.vapi file4.vapi ...
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The key behavior of valac that makes the normal source/object relationship not work is this: running $(VALAC) --fast-vapi=foo.vapi foo.vala might not change the modification date of foo.vapi. $(VALAC) -C foo.vala --use-fast-vapi=*.vapi might not change the modification date of foo.c. So foo.vapi/foo.c remain perpetually out of date. –  Matthew Jul 19 '12 at 20:01
    
Ah, I may be misunderstanding again. If the problem is 'might not change the modification date and it should', then a useful pattern might be $(VALAC) --fast-vapi=$@ $< && touch $@, which will ensure that $@ (=foo.vapi) is newer if the compilation is successful. But perhaps you've tried this already. –  Norman Gray Jul 20 '12 at 8:13

Please check if the following works for you:

foo.out.stamp: foo.in
    # if the new foo.out has different contents than the old foo.out
    update foo.out && touch foo.out.stamp
    #else
    touch -r foo.out foo.out.stamp

foo.out: foo.out.stamp

The second invocation of touch updates the time stamp of foo.out.stamp with that of foo.out. From the manpage:

-r, --reference=FILE
      use this file's times instead of current time
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This does not work, because foo.out in the real makefile is foo.c, which must then be compiled to foo.o. This approach will cause unnecessary recompilation of foo.c -> foo.o. –  Matthew Jul 19 '12 at 23:39
    
@Matthew: Have you tried it? The touch -r will reset the timestamp of foo.out aka foo.c backward in time, thus causing no recompilation (just my guess...). –  krlmlr Jul 20 '12 at 1:41
    
touch -r foo.out foo.out.stamp resets the timestamp of foo.out.stamp to that of foo.out, not the other way around. Neither order (-r foo.out foo.out.stamp or -r foo.out.stamp foo.out) works, for the reasons that I described in my original question. I did try both. –  Matthew Jul 23 '12 at 18:59

The following seems to match your description of the relationships between the .vapa and .vali files:

% cat Makefile
VFILES=A B

.PRECIOUS: $(VFILES:=.vapi)

%.vapi: %.vala
    touch $@

%.c: %.vala $(VFILES:=.vapi)
    echo "$^" >$@

%.o: %.c
    touch $@

all: A.o
% ls
A.vala      B.vala      Makefile
% make A.o
touch A.vapi
touch B.vapi
echo "A.vala A.vapi B.vapi" >A.c
touch A.o
rm A.c
% make B.o
echo "B.vala A.vapi B.vapi" >B.c
touch B.o
rm B.c
% touch A.vala
% make B.o    
touch A.vapi
echo "B.vala A.vapi B.vapi" >B.c
touch B.o
rm B.c
% make A.o
echo "A.vala A.vapi B.vapi" >A.c
touch A.o
rm A.c
% ls -lt
total 24
-rw-r--r--  1 norman  wheel    0 19 Jul 00:11 A.o
-rw-r--r--  1 norman  wheel    0 19 Jul 00:11 A.vapi
-rw-r--r--  1 norman  wheel    0 19 Jul 00:11 B.o
-rw-r--r--  1 norman  wheel    6 19 Jul 00:11 A.vala
-rw-r--r--  1 norman  wheel    0 19 Jul 00:10 B.vapi
-rw-r--r--  1 norman  wheel    6 19 Jul 00:10 B.vala
-rw-r--r--  1 norman  wheel  141 19 Jul 00:09 Makefile
% 

Does that work?

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This does not work for the reasons described in my original question, as well as in my comment to Jonathan. .c/.vapi files will not change their modification time if their contents do not change. –  Matthew Jul 19 '12 at 23:37
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I ended up solving this by adding a top-level rule that ensures the stamps are always up to do, and empty rules for the real output files:

all: %.out.stamp

%.out: ;

Technically that isn't exactly what I did, because I am not writing the Makefiles by hand (I am working with cmake). In CMake terms, I added a custom target that depends on all the .vapi.stamp and .dep (similar to a .c.stamp) files. The CMake target that builds the executable/library from the .c files depends on this target.

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