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What is the alternative if I need to use a reference, and the data I am passing I cannot change the type of, hence I cannot really store a pointer to it?

Code:

    #include <map>     
    #include<iostream>
    #include<string>     

    using namespace std;

    int main()
    {
       string test;
       pair<string, string> p=pair<string, string>("Foo","Bar");
       map<pair<string, string>, string&> m;
       m[make_pair("aa","bb")]=test;

       return 0;
}

Error:

$ g++ MapPair.cpp /usr/include/c++/3.2.3/bits/stl_map.h: In instantiation of std::map<std::pair<std::string, std::string>, std::string&, std::less<std::pair<std::string, std::string> >, std::allocator<std::pair<const std::pair<std::string, std::string>, std::string&> > >': MapPair.cpp:15:
instantiated from here /usr/include/c++/3.2.3/bits/stl_map.h:221: forming reference to reference type
std::string&' MapPair.cpp: In function int main()': MapPair.cpp:16: no match for std::map, std::string&, std::less >,
std::allocator,
std::string&> > >& [std::pair]' operator /usr/include/c++/3.2.3/bits/stl_pair.h: At global scope: /usr/include/c++/3.2.3/bits/stl_pair.h: In instantiation of std::pair<const std::pair<std::string, std::string>, std::string&>': /usr/include/c++/3.2.3/bits/stl_tree.h:122: instantiated from std::_Rb_tree_node

What am I doing wrong to cause this errror?

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I advise readers to scroll down to the answer given by Mozza314. The top answers (while I'm writing this) are outdated. –  Aberrant Aug 1 at 10:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 20 down vote accepted

You cannot store references. References are just aliases to another variable.

The map needs a copy of the string to store:

map<pair<string, string>, string> m;

The reason you are getting that particular error is because somewhere in map, it's going to do an operation on the mapped_type which in your case is string&. One of those operations (like in operator[], for example) will return a reference to the mapped_type:

mapped_type& operator[](const key_type&)

Which, with your mapped_type, would be:

string&& operator[](const key_type& _Keyval)

And you cannot have a reference to a reference:

Standard 8.3.4:

There shall be no references to references, no arrays of references, and no pointers to references.


On a side note, I would recommend you use typedef's so your code is easier to read:

int main()
{
    typedef pair<string, string> StringPair;
    typedef map<StringPair, string> StringPairMap;

    string test;

    StringPair p("Foo","Bar");
    StringPairMap m;
    m[make_pair("aa","bb")] = test;

   return 0;

}

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The previous answers here are outdated. Today we have std::reference_wrapper as part of the C++11 standard:

#include <map>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    string test;
    pair<string, string> p = pair<string, string>("Foo", "Bar");
    map<pair<string, string>, reference_wrapper<string>> m;
    m[make_pair("aa", "bb")] = test;

    return 0;
}

A std::reference_wrapper will convert implicitly to a reference to its internal type, but this doesn't work in some contexts, in which case you call .get() for access.

http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/utility/functional/reference_wrapper

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You can use boost::reference_wrapper to store references in STL containers. Here is your example modified (not tested, and definitely not very well written, just illustrates a point)

#include <map>     
#include<iostream>
#include<string>   
#include <boost/ref.hpp>



int main()
{
   typedef std::pair< std::string, std::string> PairType;
   typedef std::map< PairType, boost::reference_wrapper<std::string> > MapType;
   std::string test = "Hello there!!";
   MapType m;
   PairType pp =  std::make_pair("aa","bb");
   m.insert(std::make_pair(pp , boost::ref(test) ) );

   MapType::iterator it (m.find( pp ) );
   if(it != m.end())
   {
       std::cout << it->second.get() << std::endl;
   }

   //change test
   test = "I am different now";
   std::cout << it->second.get() << std::endl;

   return 0;
}
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that's nice... sucks that i cannot use boost :( –  Sasha Jul 21 '09 at 16:24

You cannot use references as the val, due to how the template is built. You could also use pointer instead.

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