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I have this code :

        typedef struct node
    {
        int data;
        struct node *left;
        struct node *right;
} node;

void Build (node *root , int i)
{
        if (i < 7)
    {
        root = (node *)malloc (sizeof(node));
        root->data = i;
        Build(root->left,2*i+1);
        Build(root->right,2*i+2);
    }
    else
        root = NULL;
}
void Print (node *root)
{
    if (root)
    {
        printf ("%d  ",root->data);
        Print(root->left);
        Print(root->right);
    }
}
void main()
{
    node *tree;

    Build(tree,0);
    Print(tree);
}

two things that I dont understand , 1. why can't I pass Build(tree,0) ? it says it's uninitialized , but why shuold I care if it's uninitialized ? I'm allocating all the memory needed straight away so it's gonna be pointing on the new allocated node.

how can I fix this code? thank you!!!

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1  
void main() :( –  Marlon Jul 19 '12 at 0:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your node * to tree is uninitialized.

node *tree;

That matters because the code line

root = (node *)malloc (sizeof(node));

allocates memory to a local copy of root. Once you leave function scope of Build, the copy of root goes out of scope. Memory leak.

Remember, everything is passed by value in C.

If you really want Build to allocate the memory, the signature would have to be

void Build (node **root , int i)

and your code in that method would have to refer to *root instead of root.

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but even if it's local - so what? it should not dissapear when I finish the func –  user1386966 Jul 18 '12 at 23:39
    
Sure it does. The pointer is passed by value, which means there is a local copy of the pointer on the stack... a pointer that points to nothing. Your malloc assigns memory to the local (stack) copy of root. Try stepping through in a debugger. –  Eric J. Jul 18 '12 at 23:46

Parameters are passed by value - the location in memory is not actually passed. So when you call Build, you're just passing in the value of tree, which happens to be uninitialized. The Build function creates a local root variable with that value - when you set root = ... in Build, you're over-writing that undefined value with the new value, but that new value is still just in the local root variable - it is never seen by the tree variable in main.

What you really want to do is have Build return the newly created tree pointer:

node * Build(int i)
{
    node *root;
    ...
        root->left = Build(2*i+1)
    ...
    return root;
}

void main() 
{
    ...
    tree = Build(0);
    ...
}
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