Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm trying to write a program that will tell me if all the tags in an HTML file are balanced, so every <tag> has a </tag>. I'm not worried about the self closing tags at this point. What I have I thought would work, but isn't quite right. It's looking at each element instead of looking for the open and closing tags as a whole. Can anyone tell me what I'm doing wrong?

const string opening = "<*>";
const string closing = "</*>";
string input;



int main()
{
    char element;
    stack<char> stk;
    ifstream file;

    cout << "Please Enter File name: ";
         cin >> input;

    //std::file.open(input);

    file.open(input.c_str());

    if(file.fail())
        cout<<"File is corrupt or does not exists!"<<endl;

    while(!file.eof())
    {
        file>>element;

        //push left group symbols onto stack
        if(element==opening[0])
            stk.push(element);
        else if(element==opening[1])
            stk.push(element);
        else if(element==opening[2])
            stk.push(element);

    }
    file.close();
    file.open(input.c_str());
    while(!file.eof())
    {
        file>>element;

        if(stk.top()==opening[0])
        {
            if(element==closing[0])
                stk.pop();
        }
        else if(stk.top()==opening[1])
        {
            if(element==closing[1])
                stk.pop();
        }
        else if(stk.top()==opening[2])
        {
            if(element==closing[2])
                stk.pop();
        }
    }
    file.close();

    if(!stk.empty())
        cout<<"\nILLEGAL"<<endl;
    else if(stk.empty())
        cout<<"\nLEGAL"<<endl;

    cout << "\n\nProgram complete." <<  endl;
    return 0;
}

I'm fairly new to C++ and especially stacks so please explain answers so that I might learn.

share|improve this question
    
Are the tags in the file literally composed of <*> and </*>? Also, remember it's legal to have something like <br/>. –  chris Jul 19 '12 at 0:17
    
while (!file.eof()) file >> element; is better replaced with while (file >> element). See this question for an explanation of that. –  chris Jul 19 '12 at 0:22
    
I've been testing this a bit. I used a file containing this: <*></*><*></*> And I've found that for some reason, when rereading the file, it reads the last character twice. –  jrad Jul 19 '12 at 0:28
    
@chris No the file is not composed of <*> and </*>. I thought having the * would assume anything could be there. Would I instead need to have something like "<" && ">" and "</" && ">"? Also, I realize <br/> is legal, but for this case I don't need to worry about that. And thanks for the .eof tip! –  Jmh2013 Jul 19 '12 at 0:30
1  
@chris, I don't want the finished product. I'm trying to learn C++ with a book that I have and it had me write a stack to check balance of () {} [] in a text file and I did that ok. So I decided to try to check html tags, but its a little more challenging that I had initially thought. I will try changing my code to use find() or substr(). –  Jmh2013 Jul 19 '12 at 0:53

1 Answer 1

I found your error. You say this:

 if(stk.top()==opening[0])
    {
        if(element==closing[0])
            stk.pop();
    }
    else if(stk.top()==opening[1])
    {
        if(element==closing[1])
            stk.pop();
    }
    else if(stk.top()==opening[2])
    {
        if(element==closing[2])
            stk.pop();
    }

opening[0] = '<' and closing[0] = '<' so that's okay. But unfortunately, that doesn't hold true for the rest of the characters:

opening[1] = '*' and closing[1] = '/'

Unfortunately, even when I change the code to this:

 if(stk.top()==opening[0])
    {
        if(element==closing[0])
            stk.pop();
    }
    else if(stk.top()==opening[1])
    {
        if(element==closing[2])
            stk.pop();
    }
    else if(stk.top()==opening[2])
    {
        if(element==closing[3])
            stk.pop();
    }

it still does not work. I'll look into it further.

share|improve this answer
    
I realize it is looking at the individual characters, but I think I need it to find the opening < and ignore everying till it finds > then push. and pop once it finds the corresponding </again ignoring untill it finds >. –  Jmh2013 Jul 19 '12 at 0:55
    
My point was that you were mismatching the characters. If you ignore everything in between, then you don't know if you're encountering the correct corresponding </. Say you have a file that reads <file></endoffile>. You'll see a <, a >, a </, and another >, but what's in between does not match up. –  jrad Jul 19 '12 at 0:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.