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I have been given a rather odd requirement to fulfill for a particular solution. The requirement is to write a function given the current number, to find the next consecutive number that excludes numbers with two or more consecutive 6s.

So far I have the following code (in C#) which I tested with a few inputs and it works. I know it's not the most efficient solution but it does the job, I just want to see if there's a more efficient way of doing this. The way I go about it is by converting the number into a string and using a simple regular expression to see if the next sequence is a valid one given the requirement. Also I am aware that it will throw a error once the number reaches its (2^31) - 1 limit, but at the moment that's not an issue.

public int GetNextSequenceNumber(int currentSequenceNumber)
{
    var nextSequenceCandidate = currentSequenceNumber + 1;
    var strNum = nextSequenceCandidate.ToString();

    if (IsValidSequenceNumber(strNum))
    {
        return nextSequenceCandidate;
    }
    else
    {
        do
        {
            strNum = (++nextSequenceCandidate).ToString();

        } while (!IsValidSequenceNumber(strNum));

        return nextSequenceCandidate;
    }
}

private bool IsValidSequenceNumber(string sequenceNumber)
{
    return !Regex.IsMatch(sequenceNumber, "[6]{2,}");
}

I'm thinking there's another way where one would use division and the modulus operation to find out the digits position and increment that just as needed. Any input is appreciated, thanks!

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1  
is this for homework? – Daniel A. White Jul 19 '12 at 0:39
1  
This will be slow once the number gets up to e.g. 6600000 - it will have to loop until 6700000 – Blorgbeard Jul 19 '12 at 0:42
    
Nope, just a requirement I got at work, so I guess it's jobwork. ;) – Jose Jul 19 '12 at 0:42
1  
Is a client scared of the number of the beast appearing in their order numbers or something? – Blorgbeard Jul 19 '12 at 0:43
    
Yeah seems like they don't want to take the risk and offend anybody out there who hate 6s. – Jose Jul 19 '12 at 0:53
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The most efficient solution that I see would actually use string replacement, but this works only if you are incrementing and returning all values of the sequence. Just replace 66 by 67.

If any starting number is allowed, you will have to append just as many 0s as there were digits after the first occurrence of 66 in your number string.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah thanks for stating the obvious here (I haven't gotten much sleep these past few days!), like I said above it's not homework but a requirement for a solution. I'll mark as solved, I am confident enough I'll come up with a solution later. Thanks – Jose Jul 19 '12 at 0:48

Convert your number to decimal format, say to a byte array, scan for 66.

If you can't find it, your are done. Other wise, change it to 67, followed by all zeros.

share|improve this answer

I think you best bet is to not think in terms of incrementing a number, but in terms of validating a string. Something like the following would prevent potentially long loop runs, and should provide the next lowest possible value that doesn't have "66".

public static int GetNextSequenceNumber(int currentSequenceNumber)
    {
        int nextNumber = currentSequenceNumber += 1;
        string nextNumberStr = nextNumber.ToString();
        if (!nextNumberStr.Contains("66"))
        {
            return nextNumber;
        }
        else
        {
            //travel from left to right, find the 66, and increment the last 6 and reset the remaining values.
            bool doreset = false;
            bool lastwassix = false;
            string newString = string.Empty;
            for (int i = 0; i < nextNumberStr.Length; i++)
            {
                if (doreset) { newString += '0'; continue; }
                char c = nextNumberStr[i];
                if (c == '6')
                {
                    if (lastwassix)
                    {
                        newString += '7';
                        doreset = true;
                        continue;
                    }
                    lastwassix = true; 
                }
                newString += c;
            }
            return Convert.ToInt32(newString);
        }
    }
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