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I have a javascript call like this:

usernameTest('queijo');
alert('a');

The function usernameTest() is working and, for debugging, it alerts the string "t" or "f".

Why, when I load this page, the first alert shown is "a" and only after "t" or "f"? (Btw, jQuery is loaded into the page too.)

[EDIT]

Source Code:

function usernameTest(username) {
    var unReg = /^[0-9a-zA-Z_]{1,20}$/;
    if(!unReg.test(username))
        return false;
    $.ajax({
        type : 'POST',
        url : 'checkuser.php',
        data : 'username=' + username,
        cache : false,
        success : function(response) {
            if(response == 1) {
                alert('f');
                return false;
            } else {
                alert('t');
                return true;
            }
        }
    });
}

[EDIT2]

I already know the problem is that is calls AJAX. The new main question is now another. I'm calling it like that (in the proper place, not the code for debugging);

if(!usernameTest(argument))
    //do something

How can I do something like this?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can pass the function as a parameter to usernameTest to do what you'd like if the code that is to be used may change based on the state of the system. Otherwise, you can just write the code in the if statement directly.

function usernameTest(username, onFailure) {
    // code here...

    $.ajax({
        // ajax setup here...
        success : function(response) {
            if(response == 1) {
                //...
            } else if (typeof(onFailure) === 'function' ) {
                onFailure();
            }
        }
    });
}

var name = 'Bob';
var onFailure = function() {
    // do something
};

usernameTest(name, onFailure);

Also, please try to be specific when you ask your questions and don't change the question unless it is unclear or needs to be elaborated on. If someone has answered the original question, he/she should get credit and other questions should be asked separately.

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Thank you! And thanks for the advice also, I'm new here, and I was almost in panic when I first posted the question. –  João Luís Jul 19 '12 at 1:45

Either what @Bergi said or usernameTest() is an AJAX function - which means it's asynchronous. Consider including the source of usernameTest() function to the question - that way it'll be easier to answer.

Update: i see it is an AJAX function. You need to put your code in callback:

success : function(response) {
            if(response == 1) {
               //do stuff here - you can't return from here as this is asynchronous - i.e. happening independently (not at the same time) of the rest of the code
            } else {
                //do stuff here - you can't return from here as this is asynchronous - i.e. happening independently (not at the same time) of the rest of the code
            }
        }
share|improve this answer
    
Source code added. And yes, it is AJAX... Any way to solve this? –  João Luís Jul 19 '12 at 1:06
    
Thank you for the answer! –  João Luís Jul 19 '12 at 1:46

usernameTest makes an ajax request. The first A in ajax stands for asynchronous: the request is made, and code execution continues immediately, including the alert('a') call. Only when the response comes back from the server does the success callback execute, including the alert('t').

This style of asynchronous execution is central to Javascript development. You have to embrace it and use it to solve your problems. Fighting it will only lead to grief.

Notice by the way that the return statements you have don't return values from usernameTest. They return from the success callback. Your usernameTest function doesn't return anything. There is no way to turn an asynchronous request like this into a synchronous function return.

You need to find a way to use the answer from the server asynchronously. For example, whatever you were going to put into the if clause of your call, instead put that code into the success callback itself. Then it will have access to the true or false value.

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I'm calling it like this: if(usernameTest(argument)) blah blah blah. How should I do this? –  João Luís Jul 19 '12 at 1:18
    
@JoãoLuís: I've added to my answer. –  Ned Batchelder Jul 19 '12 at 1:30
    
Thank you for the answer! –  João Luís Jul 19 '12 at 1:47

Your usernameTest function does not alert anything, otherwise that would come before the alert "a".

I'm sure it installs an event listener for something (maybe document-ready? - I could tell you more if you gave me the code), where "user" is alerted. The event listener function is not executed immediately, but somewhen in the future.

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Never, ever, use alert. Use () { console.log() } or () { console && console.log() }.

By using alert, you see only one message. The msg you never wanted to have.

Using console.log you see in-instance your function's messages, not breaking the web:

WhaT? [OK]

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the tip! Although experienced with PHP, HTML and CSS, I am almost a noob with JavaScript... –  João Luís Jul 19 '12 at 1:48
1  
@JoãoLuís try debuggers and set breakpoints ;) my hidden favorite is IE9.10 [F12] for jS, but use also Firebug for HTML, and the V8 window for javaScript and *kit ! –  metadings Jul 19 '12 at 2:04

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