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I am using the Bash FTP command to ftp files, however i have a problem where i try to create a directory that is more than 2 folders deep. It works if i use two folders deep but if i go to three folders deep then it fails. For example:

mkdir foo/bar - this works
mkdir foo/bar/baz - this fails

I have also tried this:

mkdir -p foo/bar/baz - which didn't work, it ended up creating a '-p' directory

The shell script i am trying to run is actually quite simple but as you can see the directory structure is 3 folders deep and it fails to create the required folders:

#!/bin/bash
DIRECTORY="foo/bar/baz"
FILE="test.pdf"         
HOST="testserver"           
USER="test"         
PASS="test"         

ftp -n $HOST <<END_SCRIPT
quote USER $USER
quote PASS $PASS
mkdir $DIRECTORY
cd $DIRECTORY
binary
put $FILE
quit
END_SCRIPT
share|improve this question
    
Bash has no ftp command - ftp is an external utility and it's very insecure. Use something else such as sftp. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 19 '12 at 3:26
    
Do you have an example of how sftp could be used instead of ftp? Can i still specify the username and password in the same way? –  davey1990 Jul 19 '12 at 3:37
    
No, you should use a key file. By the way, sftp is also an external utility. See man sftp. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 19 '12 at 3:42
    
are you certain i can specify directories more than 3 folders deep with this sftp ? –  davey1990 Jul 19 '12 at 4:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

mkdir under ftp is implemented by the ftp server, not by calling /bin/mkdir no such options as -p, what you should do is

mkdir foo
cd foo
mkdir bar
cd bar
mkdir baz
cd baz

If you still want your original construct, you can also do it like this:

#!/bin/bash
foo() {
    local r
    local a
    r="$@"
    while [[ "$r" != "$a" ]] ; do
        a=${r%%/*}
        echo "mkdir $a"
        echo "cd $a"
        r=${r#*/}
    done
}
DIRECTORY="foo/bar/baz"
FILE="test.pdf"         
HOST="testserver"           
USER="test"         
PASS="test"         

ftp -n $HOST <<END_SCRIPT
quote USER $USER
quote PASS $PASS
$(foo "$DIRECTORY")
binary
put $FILE
quit
END_SCRIPT
share|improve this answer
    
yea i know that would work but when I pass the directory segments in as a parameter it makes this method very impractical especially when i have file paths of varying lengths. –  davey1990 Jul 19 '12 at 3:59
1  
pizza is right. 99% of Ftp client/servers don't support what you want. There's no way around it. Sorry. However, there are dozens of ftp clients. you might find that one that supports the -p option, but if you're doing this in a commercial environment, you probably can't get permission to install that client into your system. Not to mention the time you'll spend looking for it. ..... for loop is your friend. good luck. –  shellter Jul 19 '12 at 4:46
    
Yea thanks guys, i have resorted to using a for loop...and gradually building up the current working directory as i go. –  davey1990 Jul 19 '12 at 7:10

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