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i have a Model like so

public class School{
   public int Id {get;set;}
   public string Name {get;set;}

   static private IEnumerable<School> school;
   static public IEnumerable<School> Schools(ContextDb context){
      if(school != null)
         return school;

      return(school = context.Schools.ToList());
   }
}

Now I have a page that inserts data into the table, using ajax. The problem is when the popup closes, I would regenerate the Academy.Schools again but since the "school" variable is not null (or is cached) it would return the previous data and not the refreshed data (with the newly added record.

With that said, how do i empy that private variable so I would trigger the "return(school = ..);" line in the class?

Thanks!!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your Model design is very strange (based on the given information it's hard to offer a better one, is is some kind of ActiveRecord pattern?), but with the current design you need a new method which empties the "cache" e.g. set school to null:

public class School{
   public int Id {get;set;}
   public string Name {get;set;}

   static private IEnumerable<School> school;
   static public IEnumerable<School> Schools(ContextDb context){
      if(school != null)
         return school;

      return(school = context.Schools.ToList());
   }

   public static void InvalidateSchools()
   { 
       school = null;
   }
}

After calling School.InvalidateSchools the subsequent call to School.Schools will return the new data.

share|improve this answer
    
well, for the models i use for constants (eg. gender, country, etc) that's what i use for caching, i guess i was wrong to assume that this one will have the same use. this gets updated more frequently than others. –  gdubs Jul 19 '12 at 5:11
    
@gdubs for catalog like entities like (gender, country) I think this approach is OK. But for frequent changing ones like School maybe you don't need caching at all or use some cache invalidation logic (explicit, time based, etc.) like the one what I've shown. –  nemesv Jul 19 '12 at 6:24
    
i actually might go with that option. never thought of that.. clearing the cached variable.. thanks! –  gdubs Jul 19 '12 at 13:01

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