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Suppose we have an interface with a single generic method:

public interface IExtender
{
    T GetValue<T>(string tag);
}

and a simple implementation A of it that returns instances of two different types (B and C) depending on the "tag" parameter:

public class A : IExtender
{
    public T GetValue<T>(string tag)
    {
        if (typeof(T) == typeof(B) && tag == null)
            return (T)(object) new B();
        if (typeof(T) == typeof(C) && tag == "foo")
            return (T)(object) new C();
        return default(T);
    }
}

is it possible to avoid the double cast (T)(object)? Or, is there a way to tell the compiler "hey, I am sure that this cast won't fail at runtime, just let me do it without first casting to object!"

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Why you need (T)(Object) conversion? You can directly (T) new C() right? –  Anuraj Jul 19 '12 at 7:21
    
@Anuraj: No - that's the whole point of the question. Please read the blog post referenced in my answer. –  Jon Skeet Jul 19 '12 at 7:22

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Or, is there a way to tell the compiler "hey, I am sure that this cast won't fail at runtime, just let me do it without first casting to object!"

No, the language is deliberately designed to prevent this. Eric Lippert blogged about this recently. I agree it's annoying, but it does make a certain kind of sense.

To be honest, "generic" methods like this are usually a bit of a design smell. If a method has to have special cases for various different types, you should at least consider using separate methods instead. (GetB, GetC)

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Yup. GetB, GetC and GetEtc aren't an option here but I don't know if this is the right place to discuss the design at length. Anyway, the first paragraph and the link are the answer I was looking for. Thanks. –  fog Jul 19 '12 at 7:54

check this sample:

    public T GetValue<T>(string tag) where T : class, new()
    {
        if (typeof(T) == typeof(B) && tag == null)
            return new T();
        if (typeof(T) == typeof(C) && tag == "foo")
            return new T();
        return default(T);
    }

no cast needed, you can create instance of "T", just add the generic constraint that saying that T is a class and it have parameterless constructor so you don't need to create another base types and you can be sure that only suitable types will go through this generic method.

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Well, this is what happens when you (me, really) try to simplify the code to post as example. In the real code the instances already exist and I can't put any constraint on T. So yes, this works (thanks!) but doesn't solve my problem. –  fog Jul 19 '12 at 7:52
public T MyMethod<T>(string tag) where T : class
    {
        return new A() as T;
    }
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No, that is not possible. The only way to do so would be to let the compiler know about additional assumptions on T. As evidenced by the list of generic parameter constraints, there is no constraint defined in C# to require availability of a specific cast.

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if you let B and C implement the same interface you could use a type constraint on your T. Probably not exactly what you want, but as suggested also by others what you want is not really possible.

public interface IclassBndC {}

public class B : IclassBandC {}

public class C : IclassBandC {}

public class A : IExtender
{
    public T GetValue<T>(string tag) where T : IclassBandC 
    {
        if (tag == null)
            return new B();
        if (tag == "foo")
            return new C();
        return default(T);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Note that this requires that you can modify B and C. –  O. R. Mapper Jul 19 '12 at 7:26
    
@O.R.Mapper true, did I miss a mentioning of that not being possible? –  Bazzz Jul 19 '12 at 7:27
    
You didn't, but there was no mention that B and C are written by the OP rather than pre-defined and sealed, either. Just thought the restriction should be mentioned. –  O. R. Mapper Jul 19 '12 at 7:30

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