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I'm researching the optimising of JQuery code and was wondering if there is a way to better this code as it seems quite long...

$("#tabs-nav li a").hover(

    	function(){
    		if($(this).parent().hasClass('active')) {
    		} else {
    			$(this).stop().animate({ opacity: 1, marginTop: '24px'}, 200);
    		}   
    	},
    	function(){
    		if($(this).parent().hasClass('active')) {
    		} else {
    			$(this).stop().animate({ opacity: 0.4, marginTop: '29px'}, 200);
    		}
    	}
    );

Many thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
You are doing it wrong, use prototype! –  jjnguy Jul 20 '09 at 20:02
    
and double the amount of code –  redsquare Jul 20 '09 at 21:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can eliminate your conditionals by passing a filter to the parent function:

$('#tabs-nav li a').hover(function() {
    $(this).parent(':not(.active)').children('#tabs-nav li a').stop().animate({ opacity: 1, marginTop: '24px'}, 200);
}, function() {
    $(this).parent(':not(.active)').children('#tabs-nav li a').stop().animate({ opacity: 0.4, marginTop: '29px'}, 200);
});

If your <a> elements are immediate children of the <li> elements, you should use Josh's solution.

share|improve this answer
    
i don't think you can do that because the triggering element (A) is the one that has the animate() called upon, not its parent. –  pixeline Jul 20 '09 at 20:05
    
You are correct, I misread it. I will fix the code :o –  TM. Jul 20 '09 at 20:09
    
Won't this animate all children, if there are any? –  Adam Luter Jul 20 '09 at 20:19
    
@Adam, yes, I made an assumption of one item per <li> (which I think is fair considering that is the semantic meaning of a list). If he has multiple links per list item, then it would animate all the ones that exist in that same list item. I would hope that the HTML is not formatted this way, but you make a valid point. –  TM. Jul 20 '09 at 20:23
    
Brilliant. That works a treat! –  user141621 Jul 20 '09 at 20:30
$("#tabs-nav li:not(.active) a").hover(
    function(){
        $(this).stop().animate({ opacity: 1, marginTop: '24px'}, 200);
    },
    function(){
        $(this).stop().animate({ opacity: 0.4, marginTop: '29px'}, 200);
    }
);
share|improve this answer
    
This will work perfect IF and only if the <a> element is directly under the <li> (and not just a descendant); –  TM. Jul 20 '09 at 20:08
    
True, I would hope that's the case :) - I believe you can throw in > i.e.: li:not(.active) > a - haven't tested it though –  John Rasch Jul 20 '09 at 20:12
    
That would only make the first selector return nothing, if his document wasn't set up using immediate children. –  TM. Jul 20 '09 at 20:15
    
Won't this fail if the active class changes at runtime? –  Adam Luter Jul 20 '09 at 20:19
    
@AdamLuter good point... This should be converted to a live event handler or possibly go back to doing the classname checking inside the callback. –  TM. Jul 20 '09 at 20:27

i just rewrite one, you'll get the idea:

 function(){
                if($(this).parent(':not(".active")')) {
                        $(this).stop().animate({ opacity: 1, marginTop: '24px'}, 200);
                }   
        }
share|improve this answer
    
why is this down voted? it works, is readable and efficient. The above-mentioned selector is heavy on Sizzle (jquery selector engine). besides, it would require live() or livequery() to work at all time. –  pixeline Jul 20 '09 at 20:31
    
Not sure why, it seems workable to me :/ –  TM. Jul 20 '09 at 20:40
$(".active #tabs-nav li a")...

Just use the selector to see if the parent is active and don't use the if statements. Though if ancestors of the parent are active it will select that also. So it depends on your case.

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2  
Why is this upvoted? This is the wrong selector... –  Paolo Bergantino Jul 20 '09 at 20:18
    
In his code, he's wanting to check that the immediate parent is does not have class "active", so this won't work. This is saying that in between the ".active" and the <a> element, there would be a #tabs-nav and an li, which means that it couldn't be the immediate parent. In short, this won't work. –  TM. Jul 20 '09 at 20:20

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