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I wrote this simple script to update a table in MySQL. For that, I created a for-loop and tried the following (codepad link):

sUpdate = [[UPDATE `latest`
SET `date` = '%s'
WHERE `date` = '%s'
AND `fid` > 50000]]

for i = 1, 12 do
  print( i )
  sOldDate = "2009-"..tostring(i).."-10"
  sNewDate = "2010-09-"..tostring(i)
  sUpdate = string.format( sUpdate, sNewDate, sOldDate )
  print( sUpdate )
end

The output follows:

1
UPDATE `latest`
SET `date` = '2010-09-1'
WHERE `date` = '2009-1-10'
AND `fid` > 50000
2
UPDATE `latest`
SET `date` = '2010-09-1'
WHERE `date` = '2009-1-10'
AND `fid` > 50000
3
UPDATE `latest`
SET `date` = '2010-09-1'
WHERE `date` = '2009-1-10'
AND `fid` > 50000
4
UPDATE `latest`
SET `date` = '2010-09-1'
WHERE `date` = '2009-1-10'
AND `fid` > 50000
5
UPDATE `latest`
SET `date` = '2010-09-1'
WHERE `date` = '2009-1-10'
AND `fid` > 50000
6
UPDATE `latest`
SET `date` = '2010-09-1'
WHERE `date` = '2009-1-10'
AND `fid` > 50000
7
UPDATE `latest`
SET `date` = '2010-09-1'
WHERE `date` = '2009-1-10'
AND `fid` > 50000
8
UPDATE `latest`
SET `date` = '2010-09-1'
WHERE `date` = '2009-1-10'
AND `fid` > 50000
9
UPDATE `latest`
SET `date` = '2010-09-1'
WHERE `date` = '2009-1-10'
AND `fid` > 50000
10
UPDATE `latest`
SET `date` = '2010-09-1'
WHERE `date` = '2009-1-10'
AND `fid` > 50000
11
UPDATE `latest`
SET `date` = '2010-09-1'
WHERE `date` = '2009-1-10'
AND `fid` > 50000
12
UPDATE `latest`
SET `date` = '2010-09-1'
WHERE `date` = '2009-1-10'
AND `fid` > 50000

As you can see the print(i) is printing just fine, but both the sOldDate and sNewDate have i being treated as 1. Then I changed the sOldDate and sNewDate as follows:

sOldDate = string.format("2009-%d-10", i)
sNewDate = string.format("2010-09-%d", i)

And I am still getting the output of both dates as: 2009-1-10 and 2010-09-1 as seen here.

What could be problem with this loop. I have worked on such loops for a long time and they've never ever let me down until today.

I think it's just some silly mistake of mine which I am not able to identify. Any help is appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
im no lua expert but i=1 as set in the for loop and never seems to be incremented i.e. i++ –  Nicholas King Jul 19 '12 at 8:29
    
@NicholasKing Luas for-loops are programmed that way. Check PIL –  hjpotter92 Jul 19 '12 at 8:31
    
i was just doing some reading and around Lua loops and can see my comment is incorrect, like i say no Lua expert and was more of an observation than an answer. Thanks for the correction though. :-) –  Nicholas King Jul 19 '12 at 8:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yeah, the problem is that you are overwriting sUpdate every time.

The first time, you will overwrite the string placeholders %s, and after that, the string will not change again.

Try renaming the inner sUpdate. And I think you want all the variables as local?

local sUpdate = [[UPDATE `latest`
SET `date` = '%s'
WHERE `date` = '%s'
AND `fid` > 50000]]

for i = 1, 12 do
  print( i )
  local sOldDate = "2009-"..tostring(i).."-10"
  local sNewDate = "2010-09-"..tostring(i)
  local sUpdate = string.format( sUpdate, sNewDate, sOldDate )
  print( sUpdate )
end

Edit: As you can see above, I have kept your variable names, but the inner sUpdate doesn't shadow the outer one, because it's declared local. All variables in Lua are global by default, so it's good advice to make sure you use declare local variables with local. I would opt to have different variable names, something like:

local sUpdateTemplate = [[UPDATE `latest`
SET `date` = '%s'
WHERE `date` = '%s'
AND `fid` > 50000]]

for i = 1, 12 do
  print( i )
  local sOldDate = "2009-"..tostring(i).."-10"
  local sNewDate = "2010-09-"..tostring(i)
  local sUpdate = string.format( sUpdateTemplate, sNewDate, sOldDate )
  print( sUpdate )
end
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, as I said, some silly mistake of mine. I normally declared sUpdate inside the loop, and hence never faced any trouble. Thanks for the advice. :) –  hjpotter92 Jul 19 '12 at 9:41
    
Also, I hope you don't mind me choosing furq 's answer over yours as he's new to SO, and in need of some score. ^_^ –  hjpotter92 Jul 19 '12 at 9:42
    
I think you should choose the answer you think is best, for posterity. –  Linus G Thiel Jul 19 '12 at 9:43

As mentioned, you need to rename sUpdate inside the loop to avoid overwriting the outer one and breaking string.format(). You can then use %02d in string.format() to zero-pad numbers to at least two digits in length:

local sUpdate = [[UPDATE `latest`
SET `date` = '%s'
WHERE `date` = '%s'
AND `fid` > 50000]]

for i = 1, 12 do
  print( i )
  local sOldDate = string.format("2010-%02d-10", i)
  local sNewDate = string.format("2010-09-%02d", i)
  local update = string.format( sUpdate, sNewDate, sOldDate )
  print( update )
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the answer. :) –  hjpotter92 Jul 19 '12 at 9:49

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