Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a big unix text file and I want to get the line that exists 3 lines above the matching line.

How can I do that?

Note I do not want to get the lines in between. Hence, if text is

one
two
three
four

and I am looking for string 'three', I want to get as output

one

and not

one
two
three
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here's one: first grep the word you're looking for with context two lines back:

$ grep -B 2

which gives:

one
two
three
--
one
two
three
--
one
two
three
(...)

then print every fourth line using sed:

$ grep -B 2 three test.txt |sed -n '1~4'p

(got the sed part from here: http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/09/unix-sed-tutorial-printing-file-lines-using-address-and-patterns/

share|improve this answer

Using awk
http://www.gnu.org/software/gawk/manual/html_node/Array-Basics.html#Array-Basics

awk -v n=3 '{s[NR%n]=$0} /three/{print s[(NR-n+1)%n]}' foo.txt
share|improve this answer
1  
s[(NR-n+1)] could be simplified as s[(NR+1)%n]. To be on the safe side, you could replace /three/ by NR >= n && /three/ to ensure that we have already seen n lines. –  Ael Ombreglace Jul 19 '12 at 11:58

Use grep with below options

   -A NUM, --after-context=NUM
          Print NUM lines of trailing context after matching lines.  Places a line containing -- between contiguous groups of matches.


   -B NUM, --before-context=NUM
          Print NUM lines of leading context before matching lines.  Places a line containing -- between contiguous groups of matches.

Hence as per your requirement, use the command:

grep -B 3 three <filename>
share|improve this answer
    
No. grep -B is not an option, because it prints the lines in between. See my note on the question. It clearly says that I do not want the lines in between. –  p.matsinopoulos Jul 19 '12 at 9:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.