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I have some code for transformation matrices and I added some functions that deal with Frustum and Perspective.

The thing is that when I call the perspective everything looks as if I have a really big field of view (ok in the middle of the screen while very stretched at the edges). This effect is worse when I increase the near value.

    void Frustum(T left, T right, T bottom, T top, T zNear, T zFar)
    {
        m[0][0]=2.0f*zNear/(right-left);
        m[1][0]=0.0f;
        m[2][0]=(right+left)/(right-left);
        m[3][0]=0.0f;
        m[0][1]=0.0f;
        m[1][1]=2.0f*zNear/(top-bottom);
        m[2][1]=(top+bottom)/(top-bottom);
        m[3][1]=0.0f;
        m[0][2]=0.0f;
        m[1][2]=0.0f;
        m[2][2]=-(zFar+zNear)/(zFar-zNear);
        m[3][2]=-2.0f*zFar*zNear/(zFar-zNear);
        m[0][3]=0.0f;
        m[1][3]=0.0f;
        m[2][3]=-1.0f;
        m[3][3]=0.0f;
    }

    void Perspective(T fovy,T aspectRatio,T zNear,T zFar)
    {
        T xmin,xmax,ymin,ymax;
        ymax= zNear* tan(fovy*Math<T>::PI/360.0);
        ymin= -ymax;
        xmin= ymin*aspectRatio;
        xmax= ymax*aspectRatio;
        Frustum(xmin,xmax,ymin,ymax,zNear,zFar);
    }

T is a float or a double as the class is templated (for the test I only used floats).

The test values I use are fovy="60" znear="1.0" zfar="1000.0" and when I change them to fovy="60" znear="10.0" zfar="1000.0" it get's a lot worse.

Note that the matrices are DirectX style yet I use them in OpenGL and thus I have change the order of multiplication in the shader.

Do you guys see anything wrong with my code?

Thanks

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please try changing znear to 16.0 and tell me if it is faster now –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 19 '12 at 9:16
    
are you using any optimizations? because you are setting 1.0 to znear means it is not used in multiplications –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 19 '12 at 9:18
    
and, you get rid of 3 multiplications when you set znear to 1.0 –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 19 '12 at 9:19
    
I'm not using any optimizations. As said, if I set znear to 10 it will be even more messed up. The object that I render will be smaller and will basically look like it's very far away and as I rotate the camera it will look like it's warping towards the edges of the display. Setting it to 16 will cause it to look even worse. –  Sanctus2099 Jul 19 '12 at 11:47
    
if you are not using optimizations, then read my answer below –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 19 '12 at 11:53
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3 Answers

calculate

z_delta=(zfar-znear);//used two times!
direction=(right-left);//used two times!
height=(top-bottom);//used two times!
znear_2=2.0f*znear; //used 3 times!

only once! and then use it anywhere you want

and, division is so expensive that you can pre-calculate divisions and store in an array, you just need to fetch that pre-calculated elements from array in the execution.

for example: if top and bottom ranges are small, then you can represent the calculations in a small array(actually it is mapping of a divison and a divider)

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2  
Why? Any half-decent compiler will perform this optimization. Giving the quantities descriptive names might make sense though. –  Jørgen Fogh Jul 19 '12 at 9:32
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem was that when I started using the matrices that were transposed (DirectX style) I figured I must also transpose the frustum math which isn't a good idea.

This is how the Frustum function should look like:

    void Frustum(T left, T right, T bottom, T top, T zNear, T zFar)
    {
        T zDelta = (zFar-zNear);
        T dir = (right-left);
        T height = (top-bottom);
        T zNear2 = 2*zNear;

        m[0][0]=2.0f*zNear/dir;
        m[0][1]=0.0f;
        m[0][2]=(right+left)/dir;
        m[0][3]=0.0f;
        m[1][0]=0.0f;
        m[1][1]=zNear2/height;
        m[1][2]=(top+bottom)/height;
        m[1][3]=0.0f;
        m[2][0]=0.0f;
        m[2][1]=0.0f;
        m[2][2]=-(zFar+zNear)/zDelta;
        m[2][3]=-zNear2*zFar/zDelta;
        m[3][0]=0.0f;
        m[3][1]=0.0f;
        m[3][2]=-1.0f;
        m[3][3]=0.0f;
    }
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I think the problem is in Perspective(): when computing ymax, you should not be multiplying by zNear. Mathematically, you're projecting onto a plane at unit distance, not the zNear plane; that value has no business there.

Try just setting ymax= tan(fovy*Math<T>::PI/360.0) instead. Still no guarantee that it'll be correct, but that should be significantly more sane...

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I never fully undestood projection math but I'm pretty sure that's has nothing to do. Look at this: songho.ca/opengl/gl_transform.html –  Sanctus2099 Jul 20 '12 at 8:41
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