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I'm a novice using XSLT. My requirement is best expressed through code. I'm looking for advice as to whether its possible to achieve my requirements through XLST. I'm not asking people to write code for me - although code advice would also be appreciated. I'm looking for pointers, e.g. "I need to chain multiple transforms". I'm using XSLT v1.0.

I have the input XML;

<Input>
  <BarId>123</BarId>
  <BarName>myname</BarName>
  <FooName>dummy</FooName>
</Input>

...and need to create the output;

<Out>
  <Foos>
    <Foo>
      <Id>100</Id>
      <Name>dummy</Name>
    </Foo>
  </Foos>
  <Bars>
    <Bar>
      <Id>123</Id>
      <Name>myname</Name>
      <FooId>100</FooId>
    </Bar>
  </Bars>
</Out>

Key Point:

Creating the Foo element is the part I need help with.

The Foo element(s) most precede the Bar element(s).

I'm not overly concerned about generating the Foo Id (i.e. in above example 100) - I have a few options here - but I guess the approach for populating the FooId on the Bar will depend on the overall approach?

(ps. apologies for vague title - Ill update accordingly based on resolution)

share|improve this question
    
I think you are going to need a lot more information to come up with something useful. It would be easy to write something that took what you have and give you something you want, but it leaves the questions, are there multiple inputs, multiple foos, multiple bars. what is the significance of the FooId, why is it an element rather than an attribute, is that essential? etc –  Woody Jul 19 '12 at 10:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I am assuming you want to output a Foo element with a unique ID for each distinct FooName in the input. For this, you could use the Muenchian method:

First you'd build a xsl:key using which you can quickly retrieve FooName elements by their content.

<xsl:key name="FooNames" match="FooName" use="."/>

Using this key, you can then process only the first instance of each FooName, thus getting a distinct list. Here you can make use of the generate-id() function for comparing nodes for identity.

<xsl:apply-templates select="//FooName
                             [generate-id() = 
                              generate-id(key('FooNames', .)[1])]"/>

For generating the identifiers, if you don't care that the generated identifiers may vary from run to run, you can again use the generate-id() function.

Putting it all together:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
  <xsl:output method="xml" indent="yes" omit-xml-declaration="yes"/>
  <xsl:key name="FooNames" match="FooName" use="."/>

  <xsl:template match="/">
    <Out>
      <Foos>
        <xsl:apply-templates select="//FooName[generate-id() = 
                                     generate-id(key('FooNames', .)[1])]"/>
      </Foos>
      <Bars>
        <xsl:apply-templates select="//Input"/>
      </Bars>
    </Out>
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="FooName">
    <Foo>
      <Id><xsl:value-of select="generate-id()"/></Id>
      <Name><xsl:value-of select="."/></Name>
    </Foo>
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="Input">
    <Bar>
      <Id><xsl:value-of select="BarId"/></Id>
      <Name><xsl:value-of select="BarName"/></Name>
      <FooId>
        <xsl:value-of select="generate-id(key('FooNames', FooName)[1])"/>
      </FooId>
    </Bar>
  </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

With the following sample input:

<Inputs>
  <Input>
    <BarId>123</BarId>
    <BarName>myname</BarName>
    <FooName>dummy</FooName>
  </Input>
  <Input>
    <BarId>124</BarId>
    <BarName>anothername</BarName>
    <FooName>dummy</FooName>
  </Input>
  <Input>
    <BarId>125</BarId>
    <BarName>yetanothername</BarName>
    <FooName>dummy-two</FooName>
  </Input>
</Inputs>

It will yield the output:

<Out>
  <Foos>
    <Foo>
      <Id>id213296</Id>
      <Name>dummy</Name>
    </Foo>
    <Foo>
      <Id>id214097</Id>
      <Name>dummy-two</Name>
    </Foo>
  </Foos>
  <Bars>
    <Bar>
      <Id>123</Id>
      <Name>myname</Name>
      <FooId>id213296</FooId>
    </Bar>
    <Bar>
      <Id>124</Id>
      <Name>anothername</Name>
      <FooId>id213296</FooId>
    </Bar>
    <Bar>
      <Id>125</Id>
      <Name>yetanothername</Name>
      <FooId>id214097</FooId>
    </Bar>
  </Bars>
</Out>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jukka. I have tested this out and it does indeed work! Thanks NB for the supporting text / links - makes v clear what's happening. –  Damo Jul 19 '12 at 13:07

It can be as simple as this, assuming a BarName precedes its corresponding FooName:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="/*">
     <Out>
      <Foos>
       <xsl:apply-templates select="FooName"/>
      </Foos>
      <Bars>
       <xsl:apply-templates select="BarName"/>
      </Bars>
     </Out>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="FooName">
  <Foo>
    <Id><xsl:call-template name="makeFooId"/></Id>
    <Name><xsl:value-of select="."/></Name>
  </Foo>
 </xsl:template>
 <xsl:template match="BarName">
   <Bar>
    <Id><xsl:value-of select="preceding-sibling::BarId[1]"/></Id>
    <Name><xsl:value-of select="."/></Name>
    <FooId>
      <xsl:call-template name="makeFooId">
        <xsl:with-param name="pFoo" select="following-sibling::FooName[1]"/>
      </xsl:call-template>
    </FooId>
  </Bar>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template name="makeFooId">
  <xsl:param name="pFoo" select="."/>

  <!-- Replace the following line with your id - generating code -->
  <xsl:text>100</xsl:text>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied to the provided XML document:

<Input>
    <BarId>123</BarId>
    <BarName>myname</BarName>
    <FooName>dummy</FooName>
</Input>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

<Out>
   <Foos>
      <Foo>
         <Id>100</Id>
         <Name>dummy</Name>
      </Foo>
   </Foos>
   <Bars>
      <Bar>
         <Id>123</Id>
         <Name>myname</Name>
         <FooId>100</FooId>
      </Bar>
   </Bars>
</Out>
share|improve this answer
    
Thank-you for your post Dimitre. It useful 2 compare this approach to Jukka's post. –  Damo Jul 19 '12 at 13:11
    
@Damo: Jukka makes some guesses to conclude that grouping will be needed. This might be right or wrong. I don't make any guesses -- just use the information provided in the question. Another wild guess made by Jukka any BarName should be bound to the first unique FooName -- which I think is very likely to be a wrong assumption. You'd get more precise answers if your data was more specific, and not just a rudimentary sketch/projection of the real data. –  Dimitre Novatchev Jul 19 '12 at 13:55

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