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When mixing PHP and HTML, what is the proper indentation style to use? Do I indent so that the outputted HTML has correct indentation, or so that the PHP/HTML mix looks properly formatted (and is thus easier to read)?

For example, say I have a foreach loop outputting table rows. Which one below is correct?

PHP/HTML mix looks correct:

<table>
  <?php foreach ($rows as $row): ?>
    <tr>
      <?php if ($row->foo()): ?>
        <?php echo $row ?>
      <?php else: ?>
        Something else
      <?php endif ?>
    </tr>
  <?php endforeach ?>
</table>

Outputted HTML looks correct:

<table>
<?php foreach ($rows as $row): ?>
  <tr>
  <?php if ($row->foo()): ?>
    <?php echo $row ?>
  <?php else: ?>
    Something else
  <?php endif ?>
  </tr>
<?php endforeach ?>
</table>

I've found that when I run into this situation (quite frequently), I don't have a standard style to use. I know that there may not be a "correct" answer, but I'd love to hear thoughts from other developers.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 36 down vote accepted

The PHP and the HTML should each be indented so that they are correct with respect to themselves in source form, irrespective of each other and of outputted form:

<table>
<?php foreach ($rows as $row): ?>
    <tr>
    <?php if ($row->foo()): ?>
        <?php echo $row ?>
    <?php else: ?>
        Something else
    <?php endif ?>
    </tr>
<?php endforeach ?>
</table>
share|improve this answer
    
How would you do it in case you want to get a string containing the table instead of echoing it? –  Dane411 Nov 17 '13 at 12:19
    
@Dane411: If you're building the string using heredoc syntax, indent it as HTML. If you're building it out of small inline strings, forget about the HTML indentation, because visual comprehensibility of the HTML content is already a wash and belaboring the situation with more awkward conventions isn't going to help anything. –  chaos Nov 22 '13 at 7:00
  1. Direct answer to your question: If you need to read the HTML output often, it might be a good thing to output well indented HTML. But the more common case will be that you need to read your php source code, so it is more important that the source is easily readable.
  2. Alternative to the two options you mentioned: See chaos' or tj111's answer.
  3. Better still in my opinion: Don't mix HTML and php, use a template engine instead.
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2  
Thanks for the comments Treb. Even if I used a templating engine, the question would still exist: how to properly indent HTML/templating engine tags. –  James Skidmore Jul 20 '09 at 20:41
5  
PHP is a templating engine. :) –  chaos Jul 20 '09 at 21:08
1  
@chaos: I knew that answer would come... Maybe it is, but what I see in the example codes here is not a proper use of a template engine, but a bad mixture of code and design. –  Treb Jul 22 '09 at 6:23

I often pondered this question too, but then I realized, who gives a damn what the HTML looks like? Your users shouldn't be looking at your HTML anyway. It's for YOU to read, and maybe a couple other developers. Keep the source code as clean as possible and forget about what the output looks like.

That said, I prefer your first example, although personally I wouldn't use so many opening and closing PHP tags (I prefer HEREDOCs or echos in most cases).

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I generally put opening php tags at the beginning of the line, but indent whatever is inside the tags to match the html formatting. I don't do this, however, for simple echo statements since I use short-open tags. I think it makes simpler it when browsing through the file to find all the declarations.

    <table>
<?  foreach ($foo as $bar): ?>
      <tr>
<?    foreach ($bar as $baz): ?>

         <td><?=$baz?></td>

<?    endforeach ?>
      </tr>
<?  endforeach ?>
    </table>
share|improve this answer
    
+1: This is how I actually write (well, except I use braces, not colon/end form, and four spaces per indent level); I just adapted OP's conventions for convenience. –  chaos Jul 20 '09 at 20:44
    
I got out of this habit as it makes it a lot harder to quickly scan through your page. –  deceze Jul 21 '09 at 5:47
2  
You should not use the short opening tags. You can run into various problems with your code connected to the php setting short_open_tag. –  markus Jul 21 '09 at 5:59
2  
@markus: As it says on my Wikipedia userpage, you can have my short tags when you pry them from my cold, dead hands. And seriously, I think I'm capable of coping with the XML version tag thing. –  chaos May 11 '11 at 20:28

You can always use a bit of whitespace too to help readability. Building on chaos' indentation:

<table>

<?php foreach ($rows as $row): ?>

    <tr>

    <?php if ($row->foo()): ?>
        <?php echo $row ?>
    <?php else: ?>

        Something else

    <?php endif ?>

    </tr>

    <?php endforeach ?>

</table

The only downside with this is if you have a lot of mixed code it can make your document twice as long, which makes for more scrolling. Although if you have this much mixed code you may want to consider a templating engine.

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You just added some line breaks....that don't really add to the clarity at all IMHO. Get a decent IDE and it should color it nicely for you. –  Mark Jul 22 '09 at 2:29
    
This really is an entirely subjective matter, so of course what may be an aide for some wont do a thing for others. :) –  Peter Spain Jul 22 '09 at 5:21

You should not be bothered about markup indentation in the production environment. Neither should you use Tidy or other HTML purifiers. There are valid use cases, e.g. when you allow HTML input (but consider using Markdown instead), though these are rare.

Most often HTML beautifiers-filters are abused to hide the underlying issues with the code. Don't. Correct your markup manually.

If you need to indent your code only in the development environment, you can use either of the above. However, beware that these libraries will attempt to fix your markup (that's their primary purpose; indentation is a by-product). I've written Regular Expression based indentation tool Dindent.

Dindent will convert markup like this:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head></head>
<body>
    <script>
    console.log('te> <st');
    function () {
        test; <!-- <a> -->
    }
    </script>
    <div>
    <script src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
    <div><table border="1" style="background-color: red;"><tr><td>A cell    test!</td>
<td colspan="2" rowspan="2"><table border="1" style="background-color: green;"><tr> <td>Cell</td><td colspan="2" rowspan="2"></td></tr><tr>
        <td><input><input><input></td></tr><tr><td>Cell</td><td>Cell</td><td>Ce
            ll</td></tr></table></td></tr><tr><td>Test <span>Ce       ll</span></td></tr><tr><td>Cell</td><td>Cell</td><td>Cell</td></tr></table></div></div>
</body>
</html>

To this:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head></head>
    <body>
        <script>
    console.log('te> <st');
    function () {
        test; <!-- <a> -->
    }
    </script>
        <div>
            <script src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
            <div>
                <table border="1" style="background-color: red;">
                    <tr>
                        <td>A cell test!</td>
                        <td colspan="2" rowspan="2">
                            <table border="1" style="background-color: green;">
                                <tr>
                                    <td>Cell</td>
                                    <td colspan="2" rowspan="2"></td>
                                </tr>
                                <tr>
                                    <td>
                                        <input>
                                        <input>
                                        <input>
                                    </td>
                                </tr>
                                <tr>
                                    <td>Cell</td>
                                    <td>Cell</td>
                                    <td>Ce ll</td>
                                </tr>
                            </table>
                        </td>
                    </tr>
                    <tr>
                        <td>Test <span>Ce ll</span></td>
                    </tr>
                    <tr>
                        <td>Cell</td>
                        <td>Cell</td>
                        <td>Cell</td>
                    </tr>
                </table>
            </div>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>

Dindent will not attempt to sanitise or otherwise interfere with your code beyond adding indentation. This is to make your development/debugging easier. Not for production.

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