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In one of the WCF tutorials, I saw the following sample code:

Dim service as ...(a WCF service )

try

   ..

   service.close()

catch ex as Exception()
  ... 

   service.abort()

end try

Is this the correct way to ensure that resources (i.e. connections) are released even under error conditions?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I've had good luck with this model:

Dim service As New MyService()
Dim closed As Boolean = False
Try
    service.Open()
    If Not service.State = ServiceModel.CommunicationState.Opened Then
        ''Handle a not-opened state here
    End If
    service.MyMethod()
    service.Close()
    closed = true
Catch ex As Exception
    ''Handle errors here
Finally
    If Not closed Then
        service.Abort()
    End If
End Try
service = Nothing
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You've got the general idea correct. I've used the following extension method to keep the lines of repetitive code to a minimum.

public static class ICommunicationObjectExtensions
{       
   public static void SafelyCloseConnection(this ICommunicationObject objectToClose)
   {
      bool success = false;

      try
      {
         objectToClose.Close();
         success = true;
      }
      finally
      {
         if (!success)
         {
            objectToClose.Abort();
         }
      }
   }
}

Example of code using this extension method:

HelloWorldServiceClient client = new HelloWorldServiceClient();
HelloWorldDataContract dc = new HelloWorldDataContract();

try
{
   client.Open();
   dc = client.SayHello();
}  // Add catch blocks here for anything you want to handle.
finally
{
   client.SafelyCloseConnection();
}

Of course this is C#, but I think that should still be of help.

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See Indisposable: WCF Gotcha #1*, where he comes up with a convenient wrapper method:

public delegate void UseServiceDelegate<T>(T proxy);

public static class Service<T>
{
    public static ChannelFactory<T> _channelFactory = new ChannelFactory<T>("");

    public static void Use(UseServiceDelegate<T> codeBlock)
    {
        var proxy = (IClientChannel)_channelFactory.CreateChannel();
        var success = false;
        try
        {
            codeBlock((T)proxy);
            proxy.Close();
            success = true;
        }
        finally
        {
            if (!success)
            {
                proxy.Abort();
            }
        }
    }
}

Usage:

Service<IOrderService>.Use(
    orderService =>
        {
            orderService.PlaceOrder(request);
        });

* Link removed as it appears to be malicious.

share|improve this answer
    
I Like your solution, but do you have one, that can be used with Dependency Injection. Since a Service is a dependency, I don't want to execute my test against it. –  Preben Huybrechts Oct 10 '12 at 6:32
    
It's not my solution. In any case, I expect you could make Service<T> non-static, and inject the ChannelFactory<T>, or the IClientChannel. –  John Saunders Oct 10 '12 at 15:12

If you use a client side cache, you might consider using Expression Trees (see http://thegrenade.blogspot.com/2009/07/using-expression-trees-for-more-elegant.html):

private static TEntity GetItem<TProxy, TEntity, TIdentity>(Expression<Func<TProxy, TIdentity, TEntity>> expression, TProxy proxy, TIdentity id)
    where TEntity : class
    where TProxy : ICommunicationObject
{
    TEntity item = Cache.GetItem<TEntity, TIdentity>(id);
    if (item == null)
    {
        try
        {
            var originalDelegate = expression.Compile();
            item = originalDelegate.Invoke(proxy, id);
        }
        finally
        {
            try{ proxy.Close(); }
            finally { proxy.Abort(); }
        }
        Cache.AddItem<TEntity, TIdentity>(item);
    }
    return item;
}

Usage:

Product p = GetItem((client, identifier) => client.GetProduct(identifier), new CatalogServiceClient(), 123);
share|improve this answer
    
Rob, I don't see how your answer applies to this question. –  John Saunders Jul 21 '09 at 14:19
    
Perhaps the method example I've given is a little too specific for a generic service call wrapper. In actual fact, you need method overloads for service methods that take more than one parameter and this example does not go into that detail. However many WCF solutions contain groups of very similar methods that simply return different types in response to a get with an id parameter. And you are correct that my finally block is also missing a nested try / finally for the abort. –  grenade Jul 22 '09 at 9:51
    
I think you may need to read the question over again. Your answer doesn't address the question in any way. –  John Saunders Mar 13 '10 at 16:53

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