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I have an if statement that [obviously] only runs if the condition is true. After this if statement there is some code that should always run, after that is another if statement that should run under the same condition as the first.

The code in the middle is performing an operation using a particular element of a stack, the ifs on either side perform a push/pop on the stack before and after the operation respectively.

so the logic is something like this:

  1. Do I need to push the stack? yes/no
  2. perform operation on top of stack
  3. Was the stack pushed? (if yes then pop)

items 1 and 3 are the same condition.

This is the code that I first wrote to do this in c++

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int somefunction(){
    return rand() % 3 + 1; //return a random number from 1 to 3
}

int ret = 0;


//:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
//  Option 1 Start
//:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
int main(){
    bool run = (ret = somefunction()) == 1; //if the return of the function is 1
    run = (run || (ret == 2));              //or the return of the function is 2
    if (run){                               //execute this if block
        //conditional code
        if (ret == 1){
            //more conditional code
        }
    }
        //unconditional code
    if (run){
        //even more conditional code
    }
}
//:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
//  Option 1 End
//:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

After writing this I thought that it might be more efficient to do this:

//:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
//  Option 2 Start
//:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
int main(){
    bool run;
    if (run=(((ret = somefunction()) == 1)||ret == 2)){ //if the return of the function is 1 or 2 then execute this if block
        //conditional code
        if (ret == 1){
            //more conditional code
        }
    }
    //unconditional code
    if (run){
        //even more conditional code
    }
}
//:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
//  Option 2 End
//:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

I prefer the first method for readability as it is split into several lines whereas the second has two assignments (=) and two comparisons (==) in the same line. I want to know if it is better to use the second method (for reasons of efficiency or executable size) or if there is a better method than both.

Before anyone says it will only make an almost immeasurable difference, this is in a huge loop that has to run many thousands of times within 1/50 of a second so I would like to save as much time as possible.

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4 Answers 4

Performance should not be your concern: the modern compilers are usually smart enough to optimize the code in any case. The results will be the same if the code is doing essentially the same thing.

So you should prefer the variant which is more readable (and therefore better maintainable).

I would write something like that:

ret = somefunction();
// I don't know what is the semantics of ret == 1, so let's imagine some
bool operationIsPush = (ret == 1);
bool operationIsOnTop = (ret == 2);

if (operationIsPush || operationIsOnTop)
{
    //conditional code
}

if (operationIsPush)
{
    //more conditional code
}

//unconditional code

if (operationIsPush || operationIsOnTop)
{
    // ...
}
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2  
+1, it’s not a problem until the profiler says so. –  zoul Jul 19 '12 at 11:12
    
I see what your saying but wouldn't it have to be "if IsPush" first, then "if IsPush || IsOnTop" and then another "if IsPush"? Thanks. –  DanJAB Jul 19 '12 at 11:27
    
@DanJAB: you're right, I've adjusted the code –  Vlad Jul 19 '12 at 11:50

I believe there will be no difference in the performance here. The first reason is that your compiler will probably optimize the code in each case. The second is that you just change the place where operations take place (like "I do A->B->C or A->C->B"), not the amount of operations, so it's always the same amount of computing (1 function call, a couple of == and so on).

However consider that this (run=(((ret = somefunction()) == 1)||ret == 2)) is pretty hard to read.

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Correctness is more important than whether you fold two operations assigning a bool into one (which the compiler will probably do anyway).

For pushing/popping a stack, you should use a scopeguard (original article here). This will ensure that if something throws in the "unconditional bit", which you never really know for sure, then it still runs correctly. Otherwise you get funny a surprise (stack off by one, or overflowing).

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if theres a situation that you can split "if-else" to distinct huge loops, it will be faster

rather than

loop {  if_1  {some work}    if_2 {some other work}   }

you can

if_1 { loop {work }}    if_2 {loop{same work}}

even more extremely, if you can split the most inner "if" sentences, you can have 10-20(dpending on your situation) distinct huge loops that runs x2 x3 faster (if it is slow bacause of "if")

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the trouble with this is that each if_1 when executed must have an if_2 executed before the next if_1 can be called (in my case) –  DanJAB Jul 19 '12 at 11:24
    
so you are saying all if's are dependant –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 19 '12 at 11:25
    
Well, because it is on a stack, each iteration of the loop has to be something like: [if]push, operation, [if]pop, next iter... so it cant be lots of "[if]push" and then lots of operations and then lots of "[if] pop" –  DanJAB Jul 19 '12 at 11:30
    
hmm. you are making push-pops and checking "if" conditions at the same time –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 19 '12 at 11:33

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