Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the following code std::cout does not print the values, but printf does. Why is this?

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdio>

struct bits
{
    union
    {
        unsigned char b;
        struct
        {
            unsigned char b0:1, b1:1, b2:1, b3:1, b4:1, b5:1, b6:1, b7:1;
        };
    };
};

const union
{
    bits b[3];
    char c[3];
} CU = { .c = { -1, 0, 1 }};


int main()
{
    std::cout << "----- chars:\n";

    std::cout << "\tstd::cout (c): " << CU.c[0]
                 << ", " << CU.c[1]
                 << ", " << CU.c[2] 
                             << "\n";

    printf("\tprintf (c): %d, %d, %d\n", CU.c[0],
                             CU.c[1],
                             CU.c[2]);

    std::cout << "\n----- bits:\n";

    for (int i=0;i<3;i++)
    {
        std::cout << "\tstd::cout\n\t\t(bits): [" << i << "] = "
            << CU.b[i].b0 << CU.b[i].b1 << CU.b[i].b2
            << CU.b[i].b3 << CU.b[i].b4 << CU.b[i].b5
            << CU.b[i].b6 << CU.b[i].b7 << "\n";
        std::cout << "\t\t(b): [" << i << "] = " << CU.b[i].b << "\n";

        printf("\tprintf\n\t\t(bits): [%d] = %d%d%d%d%d%d%d%d\n",
            i, CU.b[i].b0, CU.b[i].b1, CU.b[i].b2,
            CU.b[i].b3, CU.b[i].b4, CU.b[i].b5,
            CU.b[i].b6, CU.b[i].b7);
        printf("\t\t(b): [%d] = %d\n\n", i, CU.b[i].b);
    }

    return 0;
}

Output:

----- chars:
        std::cout (c): �, , 
        printf (c): -1, 0, 1

----- bits:
        std::cout
                (bits): [0] = 
                (b): [0] = �
        printf
                (bits): [0] = 11111111
                (b): [0] = 255

        std::cout
                (bits): [1] = 
                (b): [1] = 
        printf
                (bits): [1] = 00000000
                (b): [1] = 0

        std::cout
                (bits): [2] = 
                (b): [2] = 
        printf
                (bits): [2] = 10000000
                (b): [2] = 1
share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You passed the parameter %d to printf, telling it to read the value as an int, but the same was not done for std::cout, so it interprets the values as char's and outputs the characters themselves, not their integer values.

Convert to int first:

std::cout << "\tstd::cout (c): " << int(CU.c[0])
          << ", " << int(CU.c[1]) << ", " << int(CU.c[2])
          << "\n";
share|improve this answer
1  
of course ... me looking at the forest and wondering why I keep bumping into trees ... –  slashmais Jul 19 '12 at 12:13
add comment

It has nothing to do with them being in a union.

Streaming a char to cout will output it as a character, rather than its numerical value; as printf would if you specified %c rather than %d.

The simplest way to print the numerical value of a char via cout is to convert it to int.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.