Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need what I hope is a very simple way to do this in Powershell (I'm running the Powershell scripts remotely using Absolute Manage):

if ( computer is logged out )
 {
    <run script>
 }
 else
 {
    exit
 }

Most of what I've found while searching revolves around doing something much more complicated related to user logins/logouts. I basically just need to know if the computer is currently sitting at the login prompt or not.

Thanks for any and all assistance -- you guys are awesome.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

Depending upon your environment this can be a minefield as discussed here:

Scripting Guy Article

In summary, use the PSLoggedOn tool available from the SysInternals Suite whilst being careful to filter out any service accounts which may be returned. To guard against link rot here's the usage example from the above Scripting Guy article:

$Computers = @( 
,   "PC001" 
,   "PC002" 
,   "PC003" 
,   "PC004" 
)

Foreach ($Computer in $Computers) 
{ 
    [object[]]$sessions = Invoke-Expression ".\PsLoggedon.exe -x -l \\$Computer" | 
        Where-Object {$_ -match '^\s{2,}((?<domain>\w+)\\(?<user>\S+))|(?<user>\S+)'} | 
        Select-Object @{ 
            Name='Computer' 
            Expression={$Computer} 
        }, 
        @{ 
            Name='Domain' 
            Expression={$matches.Domain} 
        }, 
        @{ 
             Name='User' 
             Expression={$Matches.User} 
         } 
    IF ($Sessions.count -ge 1) 
    { 
        Write-Host ("{0} Users Logged into {1}" –f $Sessions.count,     
            $Computer) -ForegroundColor 'Red' 
    } 
    Else 
    { 
        Write-Host ("{0} can be rebooted!" -f $Computer) ` 
            -ForegroundColor 'Green' 
    } 
 }
share|improve this answer

As described here, you can use the snippet below to get all logged on users. Note that this will contain users such as SYSTEM, LOCAL SERVICE, and NETWORK SERVICE.

Get-WmiObject Win32_LoggedOnUser -ComputerName "myMachine" | 
    Select Antecedent -Unique | 
    % { 
        "{0}\{1}" -f $_.Antecedent.Split('"')[1], $_.Antecedent.Split('"')[3]
    }

If you want to look only for people in certain domains, you can modify it slightly like this:

Get-WmiObject Win32_LoggedOnUser -ComputerName "myMachine" | 
    Select Antecedent -Unique | 
    % { 
        $domain = $_.Antecedent.Split('"')[1]
        if($domain -eq "myDomain") {
            "{0}\{1}" -f $domain, $_.Antecedent.Split('"')[3]
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

Using WMI if possible:

$info = gwmi -class win32_computerSystem -computer sist002ws -ea silentlycontinue | Select-Object username

if ($info.username.Length -gt 0)

{$Message = $info.username}
else
{ $Message = "No user is logged in locally"}

$message
share|improve this answer

This will get you all Interactive/RemoteInteractive (Terminal Services session) logged on users. You may want to add more LogonType's to the filter. No result means no one is logged in.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa394189(v=vs.85).aspx

Get-WmiObject Win32_LogonSession -ComputerName Server1 -Filter 'LogonType=2 OR LogonType=10' | 
Foreach-Object { $_.GetRelated('Win32_UserAccount') } |
Select-Object Caption -Unique
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.