Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a 1000 000 record text file, so I want to split the file into many files which will have 100 records each. Here is my code which I used listbox1 to control the file. The code is working, but with fewer records missing.

private void WriteToFile()
    {
        int RowCount = listBox1.Items.Count;
        string FileName = "C:\\Users\\bbdnet0986\\Documents\\MyExpotedQADATA";
        StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(FileName + ".txt");
        int inc = 0;
        int counter = 0;
        //StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(FileName+inc + ".txt");
        for (int i = 0; i < listBox1.Items.Count; i++)
        {
             sw.WriteLine(listBox1.Items[i].ToString());
             string me = listBox1.Items[i].ToString();

             if (RowCount > 100)
             {

                 listBox2.Items.Add(listBox1.Items[counter].ToString());
                 counter++;
                 if (counter == 100)
                 {

                     inc++;
                     sw = new StreamWriter(FileName + inc + ".txt");


                     RowCount = RowCount - counter;
                     counter = 0;

                 }
             }

             else
             {
                  sw.WriteLine(listBox1.Items[i].ToString());
             }

         }
         sw.Close();
    }
share|improve this question
2  
What's your question? –  jrummell Jul 19 '12 at 12:28
    
A ListBox is not well suited or intended to hold 1M items. –  Henk Holterman Jul 19 '12 at 12:32

3 Answers 3

In this line:

sw = new StreamWriter(FileName + inc + ".txt");

You need to .Flush() the previous sw. The writer is buffered, thats why some records are missing.

share|improve this answer

I'm not sure how your question is related to your ListBox, so i'll show you a solution which creates files from a huge file every 100th line.

It's easy with Linq and Enumerable.GroupBy:

int maxLineCount = 100;
FileInfo file = new FileInfo(hugeFilePath);

var fileGroups = File.ReadLines(file.FullName)
    .Select((l, i) => new { Line = l, Index = i })
    .GroupBy(x => x.Index / maxLineCount)
    .Select(grp => new { FileIndex = grp.Key, Lines = grp.Select(x => x.Line)});

foreach (var grp in fileGroups)
{
    var fileName = "File" + grp.FileIndex;
    var path = Path.Combine(@"C:\Temp\Test", fileName + file.Extension).ToString();
    File.WriteAllLines(path, grp.Lines);
}

Note that File.ReadLines streams the lines instead of loading all into memory.

share|improve this answer

Here's a much easier way:

private void WriteToFile() 
{ 
    // get an array of strings - you'll find out way :)
    string[] items = listBox1.Items.Cast<string>().ToArray();

    // this would also work with ReadAllLines()
    string[] items = File.ReadAllLines("Your original file");

    // path + filename prefix
    string fileNamePattern = "C:\\Users\\bbdnet0986\\Documents\\MyExpotedQADATA{0}.txt"; 

    // blocks of 100
    string[] buffer;
    for(int i = 0; i < items.Length; i += 100)
    {
        // slice the string array into 100 string blocks
        buffer = items.Slice(i, 100);

        // output the block of strings
        File.WriteAllLines(string.Format(fileNamePattern, i), buffer);
    }
}

Slice Extension:

    public static T[] Slice<T>(this T[] source, int index, int length)
    {
        T[] slice = new T[length];
        Array.Copy(source, index, slice, 0, length);
        return slice;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
This unnecessarily loads 1000000 lines into memory at once. –  Tim Schmelter Jul 20 '12 at 8:19
    
@TimSchmelter - An alternate approach since you already took the best answer. Also note that my solution is faster than LINQ and .NET 2.0-3.5 (VS 2008) friendly :) However, I suppose I could have used a FileStream instead. –  Chris Gessler Jul 20 '12 at 12:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.