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Let's say that I have a database that looks like this (MyISAM):

+------------+-------------------+------------------+
| student_id | student_firstname | student_lastname |
+------------+-------------------+------------------+
|         30 | Patrik            | Andersson        |
|         79 | Patrik            | Svensson         |
+------------+-------------------+------------------+

And I perform this query:

SELECT s.student_firstname, s.student_lastname FROM students s
WHERE MATCH (student_firstname, student_lastname) 
 AGAINST 
('+Patrik Svensson*' IN BOOLEAN mode)

This generates both of the above rows. Why do I not get 1 row in my result? Is it because the last three letters in the student_lastname are the same? Is there any way to make FULLTEXT more precise?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I have tested it, this query is giving right result

SELECT s.student_firstname, s.student_lastname FROM students s
WHERE MATCH (student_firstname, student_lastname) 
 AGAINST 
('+Patrik +Svensson*' IN BOOLEAN mode)
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Thank's! That seems to solve my problem. –  David Jul 19 '12 at 13:07

Have you tried reading the MySQL documentation?

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/fulltext-boolean.html

And I quote:

By default (when neither + nor - is specified) the word is optional, but the rows that contain it are rated higher.

And:

'+apple macintosh'

Find rows that contain the word “apple”, but rank rows higher if they also contain “macintosh”.

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That was weird, because if I remove the + I get an even more inaccurate result (more rows). –  David Jul 19 '12 at 13:05

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