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How can I feed data from one pipe to three different processes?

nulfp = open(os.devnull, "w")

piper = Popen([
    "come command",
    "some params"
], stdout = PIPE, stderr = nulfp.fileno())

pipe_consumer_1 = Popen([
    "come command",
    "some params"
], stdin = piper.stdout, stderr = nulfp.fileno())

pipe_consumer_2 = Popen([
    "come command",
    "some params"
], stdin = piper.stdout, stderr = nulfp.fileno())

pipe_consumer_3 = Popen([
    "come command",
    "some params"
], stdin = piper.stdout, stderr = nulfp.fileno())

pipe_consumer_1.communicate()
pipe_consumer_2.communicate()
pipe_consumer_3.communicate()
piper.communicate()

If I run the code above, it will produce a corrupted file. Meaning that pipe consumers are probably not reading the full output from the piper.

This one works properly but is much slower:

nulfp = open(os.devnull, "w")

piper_1 = Popen([
    "come command",
    "some params"
], stdout = PIPE, stderr = nulfp.fileno())

piper_2 = Popen([
    "come command",
    "some params"
], stdout = PIPE, stderr = nulfp.fileno())

piper_3 = Popen([
    "come command",
    "some params"
], stdout = PIPE, stderr = nulfp.fileno())

pipe_consumer_1 = Popen([
    "come command",
    "some params"
], stdin = piper_1.stdout, stderr = nulfp.fileno())

pipe_consumer_2 = Popen([
    "come command",
    "some params"
], stdin = piper_2.stdout, stderr = nulfp.fileno())

pipe_consumer_3 = Popen([
    "come command",
    "some params"
], stdin = piper_3.stdout, stderr = nulfp.fileno())

pipe_consumer_1.communicate()
pipe_consumer_2.communicate()
pipe_consumer_3.communicate()
piper_1.communicate()
piper_2.communicate()
piper_3.communicate()

Any suggestions how to make the first code snippet work the same way as the second one? If I get the first approach to work, the process would finish in 1/3 of time.

share|improve this question
    
Can be up to 1TB. –  Richard Knop Jul 19 '12 at 13:03
    
But I am using just a very small file for testing, of course. –  Richard Knop Jul 19 '12 at 13:04
    
Are all the consumers writing to the same output file? –  tMC Jul 19 '12 at 13:06
    
No, 3 different files. –  Richard Knop Jul 19 '12 at 13:07
    
I guess the first thing that comes to mind is in python, read a block from the input file and write that same block to the stdin on all the consumers; read the next block from the file and repeat. Depending on how fast the consumers are and how large your block size is, I'd imagine the I/O buffering might keep the consumers from ever clearing their input buffer? If so (and they can't put up with a pause in the input), you could buffer in the python program- but that can get complicated –  tMC Jul 19 '12 at 13:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This only uses a single byte 'block' but you get the idea.

from subprocess import Popen, PIPE

cat_proc = '/usr/bin/cat'

consumers = (Popen([cat_proc], stdin = PIPE, stdout = open('consumer1', 'w')),
             Popen([cat_proc], stdin = PIPE, stdout = open('consumer2', 'w')),
             Popen([cat_proc], stdin = PIPE, stdout = open('consumer3', 'w'))
)


with open('inputfile', 'r') as infile:
   for byte in infile:
       for consumer in consumers:
           consumer.stdin.write(byte)

When testing, the consumer output files matches the input file.

Edit: Here is reading from a process with 1K blocks.

from subprocess import Popen, PIPE

cat_proc = '/usr/bin/cat'

consumers = (Popen([cat_proc], stdin = PIPE, stdout = open('consumer1', 'w')),
             Popen([cat_proc], stdin = PIPE, stdout = open('consumer2', 'w')),
             Popen([cat_proc], stdin = PIPE, stdout = open('consumer3', 'w'))
)

producer = Popen([cat_proc, 'inputfile'], stdout = PIPE)

while True:
    byte = producer.stdout.read(1024)
    if not byte: break
    for consumer in consumers:
        consumer.stdin.write(byte)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. My input is not comming from a file, it's a stream from ffmpeg command. Would that work with that as well? –  Richard Knop Jul 19 '12 at 13:30
    
I believe so. You just read() the number of bytes you want from your producer stdout and write() that block to the stdin on the consumers. –  tMC Jul 19 '12 at 13:40
    
@tMC: I believe not. The problem is that data from a pipe can only be read once. You need to tee it to be able to read it multiple times. –  Sven Marnach Jul 19 '12 at 13:42
    
@Sven: I'm suggesting he reads that data once, and writes it multiple times. once to each consumers stdin. Akin to my code. –  tMC Jul 19 '12 at 13:45
    
@tMC: Oh, I see. I somehow misinterpreted your answer. –  Sven Marnach Jul 19 '12 at 13:47

Data from a pipe can only be read once, and will be deleted from the buffer once it ha been read. This means that the consumer processes all only see random parts of the data, that, when combined, would give the complete stream. Of course this is not very useful for you.

You could have the producer process write to subprocess.PIPE, read from this pipe in chunks to a buffer and write this buffer to all consumer processes. This would mean you have to do all the buffer handling yourself. It's probably easier to use tee to do this job for you – I'll post some example code shortly.

share|improve this answer
    
Althought the OP is on Ubantu, a solution compatible with MSW would be nice to see. {tee} is not a common command on MSW installs. –  DevPlayer Jul 19 '12 at 15:15

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