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Let's have associative array like this:

var aArray = {};
aArray.id = 'test';
aArray['x1'] = [1,2,3];
aArray['stackoverflow'] = 'What's up?';
aArray['x2'] = [4,5,6];
var keys = [];
for(var key in aArray) {
  if (aArray.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
    keys.push(key);
  }
}
console.log(keys);

Is there any easy/short way how to get array of keys to array variable without loop..?

If so, additionally, is possible to apply some regular expression to key list to get just keys that match such pattern (let's say /^x/) without (another) loop?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Is there any easy/short way how to get array of keys to array variable without loop..?

Yes, ECMAScript 5 defines Object.keys to do this. Most moderns browser engines will probably have it, older ones won't, but it's easily shimmed (for instance, this shim does).

If so, additionally, is possible to apply some regular expression to key list to get just keys that match such pattern (let's say /^x/) without (another) loop?

No, no built-in functionality for that. Mind, it's a trivial function to write:

function getKeys(obj, filter) {
    var name,
        result = [];

    for (name in obj) {
        if ((!filter || filter.test(name)) && obj.hasOwnProperty(name)) {
            result[result.length] = name;
        }
    }
    return result;
}
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+1 :: Yes, it is trivial, I am trying to use optimized way, as I am going to work with huge array, so that is only reason why I am trying to use some built-in functionality, if possible. –  Ωmega Jul 19 '12 at 13:03
    
@Ωmega: Fair enough. Sadly, no, no built-in way that combines the steps. ES5 also has Array#filter which you could use in conjunction with Object.keys, but that would require making function calls back into your iterator function for each key, which would probably defeat the purpose. –  T.J. Crowder Jul 19 '12 at 13:05
    
Why is necessary to use hasOwnProperty when I create an object from scratch? What other "keys" may pop-up, if such object will have no internal variables and functions? Would not omitting of hasOwnProperty helps to speed-up the algorithm? –  Ωmega Jul 19 '12 at 13:10
1  
@Ωmega: If you're in complete control of the codebase, and you're using {} or new Object (preferably the former) to create the object, and you don't add any enumerable properties to Object.prototype (which you probably don't, it's a very bad idea), then yes, as an optimization you can leave out the hasOwnProperty because all properties of Object.prototype defined by the spec are non-enumerable. If you're going to use this on something created via a constructor function that has any enumerable properties on the prototype, then you'd want to leave it in. –  T.J. Crowder Jul 19 '12 at 13:14

JavaScript 1.8.5 has this functionality built in with Object.keys(). It returns an array of all of the keys. You could use a shim for non-supported browsers (MDN has help on that too).

As an example see this (jsFiddle)...

var obj = { "cat" : "meow", "dog" : "woof"};
alert(Object.keys(obj)); // "cat,dog"
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More to the point, ECMAScript 5 has this feature. Mozilla's JavaScript implements it, but so do others. –  T.J. Crowder Jul 19 '12 at 12:59
    
+1 :: Thank you for prompt response. Question is, if using this built-in functionality is faster - will test... –  Ωmega Jul 19 '12 at 13:05
    
Adapted @Tj's by dumbing it down a bit (no filter). jsperf.com/object-key –  Hexxagonal Jul 19 '12 at 14:03
    
Here's a different one with a loop included of the keys. jsperf.com/object-keys –  Hexxagonal Jul 19 '12 at 14:10

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