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std::swap() is used by many std containers (such as std::list and std::vector) during sorting and even assignment.

But the std implementation of swap() is very generalized and rather inefficient for custom types.

Thus efficiency can be gained by overloading std::swap() with a custom type specific implementation. But how can you implement it so it will be used by the std containers?

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I think it is important to point out that the accepted answer isn't best practice. The answer of Dave Abrahams should be the accepted answer. –  pmr Apr 7 at 13:38
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5 Answers 5

up vote 61 down vote accepted

The right way to overload swap is to write it in the same namespace as what you're swapping, so that it can be found via argument-dependent lookup (ADL). One particularly easy thing to do is:

class X
{
    // ...
    friend void swap(X& a, X& b)
    {
        using std::swap; // bring in swap for built-in types

        swap(a.base1, b.base1);
        swap(a.base2, b.base2);
        // ...
        swap(a.member1, b.member1);
        swap(a.member2, b.member2);
        // ...
    }
};
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6  
In C++2003 it's at best underspecified. Most implementations do use ADL to find swap, but no it's not mandated, so you can't count on it. You can specialize std::swap for a specific concrete type as shown by the OP; just don't expect that specialization to get used, e.g. for derived classes of that type. –  Dave Abrahams Jun 1 '10 at 15:52
6  
I would be surprised to find that implementations still don't use ADL to find the correct swap. This is an old issue on the committee. If your implementation doesn't use ADL to find swap, file a bug report. –  Howard Hinnant Feb 23 '11 at 1:32
1  
@Sascha: First, I'm defining the function at namespace scope because that's the only kind of definition that matters to generic code. Because int et. al. don't/can't have member functions, std::sort et. al. have to use a free function; they establish the protocol. Second, I don't know why you object to having two implementations, but most classes are doomed to being sorted inefficiently if you can't accept having a non-member swap. Overloading rules ensure that if both declarations are seen, the more specific one (this one) will be chosen when swap is called without qualification. –  Dave Abrahams Apr 17 '11 at 14:24
1  
@Howard Hinnant: If your standard library implementation uses ADL to find a function called swap, then it's broken. An implementation of std::sort must meet the requirements set out in the standard regardless of whether a function called swap exists in a user defined namespace (but if a user specializes std::swap then that specialization must meet the requirements of std::swap otherwise they invoke undefined behaviour). –  Joe Gauterin Sep 23 '11 at 16:08
3  
@Mozza314: It depends. A std::sort that uses ADL to swap elements is non-conforming C++03 but conforming C++11. Also, why -1 an answer based on the fact that clients might use non-idiomatic code? –  Joe Gauterin Dec 8 '11 at 13:10
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You're not allowed (by the C++ standard) to overload std::swap, however you are specifically allowed to add template specializations for your own types to the std namespace. E.g.

namespace std
{
    template<>
    void swap(my_type& lhs, my_type& rhs)
    {
       // ... blah
    }
}

then the usages in the std containers (and anywhere else) will pick your specialization instead of the general one.

Also note that providing a base class implementation of swap isn't good enough for your derived types. E.g. if you have

class Base
{
    // ... stuff ...
}
class Derived : public Base
{
    // ... stuff ...
}

namespace std
{
    template<>
    void swap(Base& lha, Base& rhs)
    {
       // ...
    }
}

this will work for Base classes, but if you try to swap two Derived objects it will use the generic version from std because the templated swap is an exact match (and it avoids the problem of only swapping the 'base' parts of your derived objects).

NOTE: I've updated this to remove the wrong bits from my last answer. D'oh! (thanks puetzk and j_random_hacker for pointing it out)

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Mostly good advice, but I have to -1 because of the subtle distinction noted by puetzk between specialising a template in the std namespace (which is allowed by the C++ standard) and overloading (which isn't). –  j_random_hacker Mar 11 '09 at 13:56
    
Doh! thanks for pointing that out, it's been a long time since I've touched C++ so I'm blaming that for the wrong info there :) –  Wilka Mar 12 '09 at 22:34
2  
Downvoted because the correct way to customize swap is to do so in your own namespace (as Dave Abrahams points out in another answer). –  Howard Hinnant Feb 23 '11 at 1:30
    
My reasons for downvoting are the same as Howard's –  Dave Abrahams Apr 17 '11 at 14:26
2  
@HowardHinnant, Dave Abrahams: I disagree. On what basis do you claim your alternative is the "correct" way? As puetzk quoted from the standard, this is specifically allowed. While I'm new to this issue I really don't like the method you advocate because if I define Foo and swap that way someone else who uses my code is likely to use std::swap(a, b) rather than swap(a, b) on Foo, which silently uses the inefficient default version. –  Mozza314 Dec 8 '11 at 12:39
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Attention Mozza314

Here is a simulation of the effects of a generic std::algorithm calling std::swap, and having the user provide their swap in namespace std. As this is an experiment, this simulation uses namespace exp instead of namespace std.

// simulate <algorithm>

#include <cstdio>

namespace exp
{

template <class T>
void
swap(T& x, T& y)
{
    printf("generic exp::swap\n");
    T tmp = x;
    x = y;
    y = tmp;
}

template <class T>
void algorithm(T* begin, T* end)
{
    if (end-begin >= 2)
        exp::swap(begin[0], begin[1]);
}

}

// simulate user code which includes <algorithm>

struct A
{
};

namespace exp
{

void swap(A&, A&)
{
    printf("exp::swap(A, A)\n");
}

}

// exercise simulation

int main()
{
    A a[2];
    exp::algorithm(a, a+2);
}

For me this prints out:

generic exp::swap

If your compiler prints out something different then it is not correctly implementing "two-phase lookup" for templates.

If your compiler is conforming (to any of C++98/03/11), then it will give the same output I show. And in that case exactly what you fear will happen, does happen. And putting your swap into namespace std (exp) did not stop it from happening.

Dave and I are both committee members and have been working this area of the standard for a decade (and not always in agreement with each other). But this issue has been settled for a long time, and we both agree on how it has been settled. Disregard Dave's expert opinion/answer in this area at your own peril.

This issue came to light after C++98 was published. Starting about 2001 Dave and I began to work this area. And this is the modern solution:

// simulate <algorithm>

#include <cstdio>

namespace exp
{

template <class T>
void
swap(T& x, T& y)
{
    printf("generic exp::swap\n");
    T tmp = x;
    x = y;
    y = tmp;
}

template <class T>
void algorithm(T* begin, T* end)
{
    if (end-begin >= 2)
        swap(begin[0], begin[1]);
}

}

// simulate user code which includes <algorithm>

struct A
{
};

void swap(A&, A&)
{
    printf("swap(A, A)\n");
}

// exercise simulation

int main()
{
    A a[2];
    exp::algorithm(a, a+2);
}

// Output is:
swap(A, A)

Update

An observation has been made that:

namespace exp
{

template <>
void swap(A&, A&)
{
    printf("exp::swap(A, A)\n");
}

}

works! So why not use that?

Consider the case that your A is a class template:

// simulate user code which includes <algorithm>

template <class T>
struct A
{
};

namespace exp
{

template <class T>
void swap(A<T>&, A<T>&)
{
    printf("exp::swap(A, A)\n");
}

}

// exercise simulation

int main()
{
    A<int> a[2];
    exp::algorithm(a, a+2);
}

Now it doesn't work again. :-(

So you could put swap in namespace std and have it work. But you'll need to remember to put swap in A's namespace for the case when you have a template: A<T>. And since both cases will work if you put swap in A's namespace, it is just easier to remember (and to teach others) to just do it that one way.

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1  
Thankyou very much for the detailed answer. I am clearly less knowledgeable about this and was actually wondering how overloading and specialisation could produce different behaviour. However, I'm not suggesting overloading but specialisation. When I put template <> in your first example I get output exp::swap(A, A) from gcc. So, why not prefer specialisation? –  Mozza314 Dec 9 '11 at 0:26
1  
Excellent point! Formatting constraints again. Adding to answer... –  Howard Hinnant Dec 9 '11 at 0:42
1  
Wow! This is really enlightening. You have definitely convinced me. I think I will slightly modify your suggestion and use the in-class friend syntax from Dave Abrahams (hey I can use this for operator<< too! :-) ), unless you have a reason to avoid that as well (other than compiling separately). Also, in light of this, do you think using std::swap is an exception to the "never put using statements inside header files" rule? In fact, why not put using std::swap inside <algorithm>? I suppose it could break a tiny minority of people's code. Maybe deprecate support and eventually put it in? –  Mozza314 Dec 9 '11 at 1:07
1  
in-class friend syntax should be fine. I would try to limit using std::swap to function scope within your headers. Yes, swap is almost a keyword. But no, it is not quite a keyword. So best not to export it to all namespaces until you really have to. swap is much like operator==. The biggest difference is that no ever even thinks of calling operator== with qualified namespace syntax (it would just be too ugly). –  Howard Hinnant Dec 9 '11 at 1:17
6  
@NielKirk: What you are seeing as complication is simply too many wrong answers. There is nothing complicated about Dave Abrahams' correct answer: "The right way to overload swap is to write it in the same namespace as what you're swapping, so that it can be found via argument-dependent lookup (ADL)." –  Howard Hinnant Oct 2 '13 at 14:23
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While it's correct that one shouldn't generally add stuff to the std:: namespace, adding template specializations for user-defined types is specifically allowed. Overloading the functions is not. This is a subtle difference :-)

17.4.3.1/1 It is undefined for a C++ program to add declarations or definitions to namespace std or namespaces with namespace std unless otherwise specified. A program may add template specializations for any standard library template to namespace std. Such a specialization (complete or partial) of a standard library results in undefined behaviour unless the declaration depends on a user-defined name of external linkage and unless the template specialization meets the standard library requirements for the original template.

A specialization of std::swap would look like:

namespace std
{
    template<>
    void swap(myspace::mytype& a, myspace::mytype& b) { ... }
}

Without the template<> bit it would be an overload, which is undefined, rather than a specialization, which is permitted. @Wilka's suggest approach of changing the default namespace may work with user code (due to Koenig lookup preferring the namespace-less version) but it's not guaranteed to, and in fact isn't really supposed to (the STL implementation ought to use the fully-qualified std::swap).

There is a thread on comp.lang.c++.moderated with a long dicussion of the topic. Most of it is about partial specialization, though (which there's currently no good way to do).

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4  
One reason it's wrong to use function template specialization for this (or anything): it interacts in bad ways with overloads, of which there are many for swap. For example, if you specialize the regular std::swap for std::vector<mytype>&, your specialization won't get chosen over the standard's vector-specific swap, because specializations aren't considered during overload resolution. –  Dave Abrahams Feb 24 '11 at 20:46
1  
This is also what Meyers recommends in Effective C++ 3ed (Item 25, pp 106-112). –  jww Sep 5 '11 at 16:28
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Swap is generally efficient because it swaps only the internal data of the containers. It only swaps some internal pointers that refer to the data (elements, allocator, sorting criterion, if any).

You may want to write your own implementation of swap for your user defined types but why would you want to use that implementation on the standard containers ?

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